chapter04 - Chapter 4 Nucleic Acids, the Genetic Code, and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company Chapter 4 Nucleic Acids, the Genetic Code, and the Synthesis of Macromolecules
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 Nucleic acids Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) contains the information prescribing the amino acid sequence of proteins This information is arranged in units termed genes Ribonucleic acid (RNA) serves in the cellular machinery that chooses and links amino acids in the correct sequence The central dogma: DNA RNA Protein DNA and RNA are polymers of nucleotide subunits
Background image of page 2
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 All nucleotides have a common structure Figure 4-1
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 There are five principal bases in nucleic acids Figure 4-2 A, G, T, C are present in DNA A, G, U, C are present in RNA
Background image of page 4
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 Nucleotide subunits are linked together by phosphodiester bonds Figure 4-3a
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 Nucleotide terminology
Background image of page 6
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 Native DNA is a double helix of complementary antiparallel chains Figure 4-4 Hydrogen bonding between complementary base pairs (A-T or G-C) holds the two strands together
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 DNA can undergo reversible strand separation Figure 4-8
Background image of page 8
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 Analysis of DNA denaturation Figure 4-9
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 Many DNA molecules are circular and local unwinding of circular DNA can produce supercoiling Figure 4-11 supercoiled relaxed
Background image of page 10
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company 4.1 RNA molecules exhibit varied conformations Figure 4-12
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Copyright (c) by W. H. Freeman and Company
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 39

chapter04 - Chapter 4 Nucleic Acids, the Genetic Code, and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online