Assignment_for_excerpt_from_The_Way_to_Rainy_Mountain.general.docx

Assignment_for_excerpt_from_The_Way_to_Rainy_Mountain.general.docx

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English III Assignment for excerpt from The Way to Rainy Mountain N. Scott Momaday b. 1934 “The most important question one can ask is ‘Who am I?’ People tend to define you. As a child, you can’t help that, but as you grow older, the goal is to garner enough strength to insist on your own definition of yourself.” In Momaday’s writing, he focuses on the search for identity and its connection to the past. Father: a successful artist and member of the Kiowa tribe; mother: an accomplished writer of French, English, and Cherokee ancestry Grew up on reservations (rode the bus 28 miles to and from school!) His childhood developed within him a reverence for the land, as well as a strong Native American identity; this inspired him to begin writing at an early age. An author of both poetry and prose, Momaday pays tribute to Native American storytelling traditions and culture. Read his biography on page 996 to learn more. Literary Terms Memoir: form of autobiographical writing that shares personal experiences as well as observations of significant events or people. Written in a narrative style, memoirs tell the story of one person’s memory of an experience, event, or person. In Momaday’s memoir, he uses diction and tone to evoke emotion and to advance his purpose for writing; he also uses literary devices such as imagery, personification, metaphor, simile, and alliteration to lend a very poetic sense to this work of prose. Finally, Momaday carefully uses language to establish the mood . Background In the 1600s, after a bitter dispute between two chiefs, a band of Kiowa moved from what is now Montana to South Dakota’s Black Hills. In around 1785, the Kiowa migrated farther south to escape attacks by neighboring tribes, settling in what is now western Kansas and Oklahoma.
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