New-Realities-of-an-Older-America.pdf

New-Realities-of-an-Older-America.pdf - NEW REALITIES of an...

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NEW REALITIES of an OLDER AMERICA Challenges, Changes and Questions ADELE M. HAYUTIN, Ph.D. MIRANDA DIETZ LILLIAN MITCHELL 2010 8% 13% 20% 1950 2010 2050 65+ Population
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New Realities of an Older America PREFACE In less than one century, life expectancy has increased an average of 30 years in developed regions of the world. This added longevity is, at once, among the most remarkable achievements in all human history and one of our greatest challenges. More and more Americans are reaching old age, and older Americans are making up a larger share of our total population. The unprecedented demographic developments that resulted are fundamentally changing the way we live. They also bring pressures that require prompt action. The Stanford Center on Longevity has developed this briefing as a tool to increase awareness of these demographic challenges and to stimulate discussion about best practices and policies that suit this new reality. As you review the following pages, I hope the information will spark your curiosity, spur your creativity and instill a sense of urgency. The challenges and opportunities of this new type of aging will require both broadly inquiring minds and a deep understanding of the issues. Whatever your field of expertise, whatever your discipline, I invite you to explore New Realities of an Older America and join us in transforming the culture of aging so that more people reach old age physically fit, mentally sharp and financially secure. Laura L. Carstensen, Ph.D. Founding Director, Stanford Center on Longevity Farleigh S. Dickinson Jr. Professor in Public Policy and Professor of Psychology
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New Realities of an Older America TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction 3 Executive Summary 4 AGING 9 Population Structure 10 Longevity Gains 12 Population 65+ 15 Old-Age Support Programs 18 DIVERSITY 23 Total Population 24 Population 65+ 27 Working-Age Population 29 HOUSING 31 Suburban Growth 32 Living Arrangements 34 Options for Older Adults 41 HEALTH 47 Disability and Chronic Disease 48 Dementia 51 Arthritis 54 Obesity 56 Per Capita Spending 57 Causes of Death 58 PERSONAL FINANCE 61 Retirement 62 Work 64 Income 65 Expenditure 68 Net Worth 70 Poverty 71 Questions for Research and Discussion 73 Sources 75
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New Realities of an Older America: Challenges, Changes and Questions © 2010, Stanford Center on Longevity Stanford Center on Longevity Email: [email protected]
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3 New Realities of an Older America INTRODUCTION Our population is aging. The number of Americans age 65 and over will double over the next 30 years to 80 million and their share of the population will increase from 13% today to 20% in 2030. Soon there will be more old people than children. This shift toward older age brackets isn’t just about the baby boomers, and it isn’t just about older people. Rather, population aging is a major force with economic, political and social implications for our entire society — young and old.
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