lab 2.docx - TITLE PAGE Experiment 1 Projectile Motion...

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Experiment 1: Projectile Motion Equipment Needed • Mini Launcher and Plastic Ball • Meter rule • White Paper • Carbon Paper • Sticky tape Abstract The purpose of the experiment is to experimentally and theoretically calculate the range of the projectile when shot at an angle. For this, the initial velocity has to be find out which is done by shooting the ball horizontally and doing the necessary calculations which will be illustrated later on. Section 1 – Theory To theoretically predict the range of the projectile, it is necessary to find the time taken and the initial velocity. Initial velocity can be experimentally calculated by shooting the projectile horizontally with known vertical distance and horizontal distance. Since the position of the launcher is unchanged while the angle is changed, the initial velocity will hence remain same. This value can be then used to theoretically calculated range with different launch angles. The theoretical and experimental values are then compared to see if both methods yield the same results.When the ball is shot horizontally, the horizontal distance x travelled by the ball (the range of projectile) when it hits the ground after time t can be calculated using the relation: X=vnot t usman put formula The vertical distance y is the perpendicular distance from the starting position and the surface hit by the ball and can be calculated by: Y=0.5gt2 usman put formula Using this above relationship and making t the subject, the time of flight can be calculated using the following formula: t=square root 2y/g
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Now when the projectile is launched with an angle θ, the equation of time changes and is thus: This equation can be solved quadratically to get two values of time (out of which the negative one will be ignored). The value is then plugged into the first equation on this page to calculate the theoretical horizontal distance. To calculate the percentage difference between the theoretical and experimental value of range (or the horizontal distance), we use the following formula: | Part 1 – Initial Horizontal Speed Section 2a - Procedure 1. Place the plastic ball inside the Mini Launcher and gently push it inside until you hear a click sound. Ensure that the launcher is horizontal. Fire the launcher and at the point where the ball hits the table, place a sheet of paper and tape it. On top of it place a sheet of carbon paper and tape it also. 2. Record the vertical distance from ground to the Mini Launcher. 3. Record the horizontal distance from the Mini Launcher to the first edge of the paper taped on the table.
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