Section 9 F2017.pdf - NEUR 0010 Section#9 Stephanie Chan...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
NEUR 0010 Section #9 Stephanie Chan + Aidan O’Shea Memory I: Memory Systems + Amnesia (Dr. Paradiso) Memory II: Vertebrate Models of Memory (Dr. Bear) Addiction (Dr. Kauer)
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Logistics Stephanie Chan + Aidan O'Shea NEUR 0010 | F17
Image of page 2
Stephanie Chan + Aidan O'Shea NEUR 0010 | F17 Types of Memories declarative memory “easy come, easy go” storage in hippocampus, cerebral cortex events facts, places nondeclarative memory “hard to learn, hard to forget” storage in striatum, cerebellum, amygdala procedural memory: skills and habits (striatum) classical conditioning (Pavlov) skeletal musculature (cerebellum) emotional response (amygdala)
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stephanie Chan + Aidan O'Shea NEUR 0010 | F17 Memory: A Black Box Model working memory behavioral and/or sensory experience memory consolidation salience, emotion injury “where were you when… JFK was assassinated?” the 9/11 attacks occurred?” stroke, trauma, concussion, tumor… short-term memory long-term memory a ”black box” is a system or mechanism that is considered with respect to its inputs and outputs, without regard to its internal workings. we’ll uncover the black boxes in the next lecture to figure out the neural machinery that underlies each type of memory! ??? modification of synaptic transmission ??? ???
Image of page 4
Stephanie Chan + Aidan O'Shea NEUR 0010 | F17 Types of Memories working memory short-term memory long-term memory duration extremely short hours to days, depending on context and content many years capacity very small medium very large fidelity poor; gone in seconds without rehearsal can be lost with head trauma fairly resistant to head trauma synapse no permanent change synaptic change takes place long-term changes in synapse strength brain area frontal cortex is critical hippocampus is critical hippocampus may help link new sensory info to old, pre- existing info in cortex example remembering a phone number read aloud the inputs & outputs to V 1 table from Exam 2 the layout of your childhood home
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stephanie Chan + Aidan O'Shea NEUR 0010 | F17 Memory Consolidation cortical association areas parahippocampal and rhinal cortical areas hippocampus sensory information thalamus, hypothalamus fornix memory consolidation memory consolidation involves storing memory in a more permanent form— converting a less stable working memory into a long-term memory. salience and emotional connections can facilitate the process of memory consolidation, whereas damage or trauma can disrupt or prevent memory consolidation.
Image of page 6
Stephanie Chan + Aidan O'Shea NEUR 0010 | F17 The Temporal Lobe the famous neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield stimulated portions of patients’ temporal lobes while they were awake—and this elicited recall of engrams (memory traces). “I feel like I’m in the bathroom in my high school” lateral temporal lobe: high order visual areas, including area IT. responses to complex objects; sometimes multisensory.
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern