Ch10 Emotions and Health

Ch10 Emotions and Health - Psychological Science Michael...

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Unformatted text preview: Psychological Science Michael Gazzaniga and Todd Heatherton Chapter Ten: Emotions and Health Overview of Chapter Questions: How Are Emotions Adaptive? How Do People Experience Emotions? What Is the Neurophysiological Basis of Emotion? How Do People Cope with Stress? What Are Some of the Behaviors That Affect Physical Health? How Are Emotions Adaptive? Facial Expressions Communicate Emotion Emotions Serve Cognitive Functions Emotions Strengthen Interpersonal Relations Facial Expressions Communicate Emotion Darwins Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals highlighted the primacy of emotion in evolution Infants express nuanced emotions Display of emotion alters behavior in observers: smiles can avert attack Facial Expressions Communicate Emotion Facial expressions across cultures reveal universal emotions ( anger, fear, disgust, happiness, sadness, surprise ) that may be biologically based Display rules govern how and when emotions are exhibited Gender differences in display rules guide emotional expression and reflect norms Emotions Serve Cognitive Functions Perception itself has emotional coloration Positive moods facilitate creative elaborate responses to challenging problems and motivate persistence Positive moods may be accompanied by increased dopamine Emotions Serve Cognitive Functions Decision Making Somatic Markers Emotions Capture Attention Emotions Aid Memory Emotions Strengthen Interpersonal Relations Interpersonal emotions may be evolved mechanisms that facilitate relationships Guilt strengthens social bonds Socialization is crucial Embarrassment and blushing Jealousy How Do People Experience Emotions? Emotions Have a Subjective Component Emotions Have a Physiological Component Emotions Have a Cognitive Component People Regulate Their Moods Emotions Have a Subjective Component Emotions are phenomenological Primary and secondary emotions The circumplex model separates emotional valence from activation (fig 10.4) Emotions Have a Physiological Component The James-Lange theory: emotion is the result of perceiving specific patterns of bodily responses The facial feedback hypothesis provides limited support The Cannon-Bard theory has better current scientific support (fig 10.7) Emotions Have a Cognitive Component Schacters two-factor theory proposes emotions result from the interaction of physiological arousal and cognitive appraisal (figs 10.7 and 10.9) People can misattribute the source of emotional states People Regulate Their Moods...
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Ch10 Emotions and Health - Psychological Science Michael...

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