Empiricism - Empiricism Concept Empiricism • All concepts...

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Empiricism Empiricism
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Concept Empiricism All concepts from experience; none innate Aquinas: “Nothing is in the mind without first being in the senses.” Hume: “. . . all our ideas are nothing but copies of our impressions, or, in other words, … it is impossible for us to think of anything, which we have not antecedently felt, either by our external or internal senses.”
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Judgment Empiricism All knowledge of the world comes from experience There are no synthetic a priori truths
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Concept —> Judgment Synthetic a priori judgments would have to contain innate concepts If we have no a priori concepts, we can’t have any a priori knowledge
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Concept —> Judgment Locke: “Had those who would persuade us that there are innate principles not taken them together in gross, but considered separately the parts out of which those propositions are made, they would not, perhaps, have been so forward to believe they were innate. Since, if the ideas which made up those truths were not, it was impossible that the propositions made up of them should be innate, or our knowledge of them be born with us.”
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Concept —> Judgment “For, if the ideas be not innate, there was a time when the mind was without those principles; and then they will not be innate, but be derived from some other original. For, where the ideas themselves are not, there can be no knowledge, no assent, no mental or verbal propositions about them.”
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Two Kinds of Experience Sensation Vision Hearing Smell Taste Touch Reflection
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Kinds of experience Locke: “All ideas come from sensation or reflection. Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas:- How comes it to be furnished? Whence comes it by that vast store which the busy and boundless fancy of man has painted on it with an almost endless variety? Whence has it all the materials of reason and knowledge?”
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“To this I answer, in one word, from EXPERIENCE. In that all our knowledge is founded; and from that it ultimately derives itself. Our observation employed either, about external sensible objects, or about the internal operations of our minds perceived and reflected on by ourselves, is that which supplies our understandings with all the materials of thinking. These two are the fountains of knowledge, from
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course PHL 301 taught by Professor Bonevac during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Empiricism - Empiricism Concept Empiricism • All concepts...

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