Study Guide for 2-12 - CC303 Classical Mythology Spring...

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CC303 Classical Mythology Spring 2008 Prof. P. Perlman Study Guide for 2/12/2008 Apollo: Prophecy, Pollution, and Purification Part I I. Introduction For the next two sessions we will focus on the god Apollo. Your reading assignment includes the Homeric Hymn to Apollo and the opening lines of the tragedy The Eumenides by Aeschylus. You will read the entire play for Thursday. The thirty-three Homeric Hymns were composed by different poets who lived in different centuries. For the most part we do not know the names of the poets who composed the hymns. They are not the work of Homer. Some of the hymns may be as early as the 7th century B.C. Each of the hymns honors a single god or goddess. They were perhaps composed for recitation, perhaps competitive recitation, during religious festivals. They are a rich source of myth. The Homeric Hymn to Apollo may consist of two separate hymns that were at some point joined together. The first 213 lines of the Hymn describe the birth of Apollo, his spheres
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Study Guide for 2-12 - CC303 Classical Mythology Spring...

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