arnold and jackson paper - 0 Question of Honor The Scandals of Benedict Arnold and Andrew Jackson Maggie Meeks History 4197 Scandals is American

arnold and jackson paper - 0 Question of Honor The...

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0Question of Honor: The Scandals of Benedict Arnold and Andrew JacksonMaggie MeeksHistory 4197: Scandals is American HistoryFebruary 9, 2017
1Throughout American history there are two men that are notorious when you think of scandalous reputations. Benedict Arnold and Andrew Jackson are argued to be the two men mostsynonymous with moral failures in American history. Both men used their presence in the military and their reputations as honorable war heroes to gain the trust of the American government and its citizens. The Government’s trust in Arnold and Jackson allowed them to obtain power. During their life they faced a monumental moment when their honor was called into question. With their high ranking powers, one as President and one as General in the military, they had influence over political culture in The United States during times of critical international war and a time of difficult democratic politics. Benedict Arnold was and American, born in Connecticut in 1741. He began his career as a prominent business man and merchant which gained the recognition of General George Washington and led him into a prominent career in the United States Continental Army. Leading up to Benedict’s ultimate betrayal to the United States he had acquired a prominent war career. Arnold was extremely ambitious so when the revolution came to surface in 1775 he created a militia that sided and fought along with the Patriots. Later this same militia would come to serve Arnold in his own personal gains. Arnold’s heroic contribution in the Siege of Boston, the capture of Fort Ticonderoga, and the Battle of Saratoga, where he attained a leg wound, earned Arnold the highest praise from Washington and awarded the position of Commander of Philadelphia 1. Arnold’s obsession with money and power drove him to seek higher ranks and was extremely enraged when he was continuously overlooked for the title of General. Against Washington’s wishes Arnold sent in his resignation as commander, and was inevitably bestowed the title of General. Staying true to his selfness nature, in 1779, he used his power over city commerce and was caught using public transport wagons to move British merchandise, to sell for
2his own personal gain. He desired the company of the Philadelphian social elite, many of whom

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