A Study of Copper(II) Complexes with Different Ligands - DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY FACULTY OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS UNIVERSITI PENDIDIKAN SULTAN

A Study of Copper(II) Complexes with Different Ligands...

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DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY FACULTY OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS UNIVERSITI PENDIDIKAN SULTAN IDRIS LABORATORY REPORT SKT 1013: INTRODUCTION TO INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Semester 2 Sessions 2017/2018 ID NUMBER AND NAME 1. SYAHRIZAT BINTI ZAINAL (E20161014047) 2. DAYANG NOORAMINAH BINTI ABD RAHMAN (E20161014045) GROUP C LECTURER PROF. DR. MUSTAFFA BIN AHMAD EXPERIMENT NO. 2 TITLE A STUDY OF COPPER(II) COMPLEXES WITH DIFFERENT LIGANDS DATE 15 NOV 2017
INTRODUCTION A complex ion has a metal ion at its center with a number of other molecules or ions surrounding it. These can be considered to be attached to the central ion by co-ordinate as a dative covalent bonds. In some cases, the bonding is actually more complicated than that. Ligands can be anions, cations or neutral molecules. Ligands can be further characterized as monodentate, bidentate and tridentate. A monodentate ligand has only one donor atom used to bond to the central metal atom or ion. There are many types of ligands which is monodenate ligand, bidentate ligand and polydentate ligands. The term "monodentate" can be translated as "one tooth," which referring to the ligand binding to the center through only one atom. Some examples of monodentate ligands are chloride ions, referred to as chloro when it is a ligand, water, referred to as aqua when it is a ligand, hydroxide ions, referred to as hydroxo when it is a ligand and ammonia, referred to as ammine when it is a ligand. Bidentate ligands have two donor atoms which allow them to bind to a central metal atom or ion at two points. Common examples of bidentate ligands are ethylenediamine and the oxalate ion. Polydentate ligands range in the number of atoms used to bond to a central metal atom or ion. EDTA, a hexadentate ligand, is an example of a polydentate ligand that has six donor atoms with electron pairs that can be used to bond to a central metal atom or ion. A metal ion in solution does not exist in isolation but in combination with ligands such as solvent molecules or simple ions or chelating groups, giving rise to complex ions or coordination compounds. These complexes contain a central atom or ion, often a transition metal and a cluster of ions or neutral molecules surrounding it. Ligands are ions or neutral

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