Test - Djassemi - 2014 - Lean Adoption in Small Manufacturing Shops.pdf

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 10 pages.

The Journal of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering The Journal of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering© is an official publication of the Association of Technology, Managment, and Applied Engineering, Copyright 2014 ATMAE 1390 Eisenhower Place Ann Arbor, MI 48108 V O L U M E 3 0 , N U M B E R 1 January through March 2014 Lean Adoption in Small Manufacturing Shops: Attributes and Challenges P E E R - R E F E R E E D PA P E R n A P P L I E D PA P E R S Keywords: Lean Manufacturing/Six Sigma, Manufacturing, Research Author: Dr. Manocher Djassemi Abstract/Article 2 References 10
2 The Journal of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering VOLUME 30, NUMBER 1 JANUARY – MARCH 2014 LEAN ADOPTION IN SMALL MANUFACTURING SHOPS: ATTRIBUTES AND CHALLENGES Lean Adoption in Small Manufacturing Shops: Attributes and Challenges Dr. Manocher Djassemi ABSTRACT This study presents a practical framework for introducing lean principles in small manufactur- ing shops. These shops are characterized by low volume, large variety and one-of-a kind products, accounting for a significant portion of the U.S. manufacturing industry. The potential challenges for adopting a lean system in small manufacturing shops are reviewed. An implementation strategy encompassing the formation of diverse teams of employees, training by external consultants, and the exploration of process improvement opportuni- ties are discussed. While the author’s observations point to the success of lean implementation in a local small manufacturing shop, they also reveal several potential barriers as impediments to intro- ducing lean culture in these types of shops. INTRODUCTION Lean manufacturing principles are aimed at elimi- nating all forms of waste or non-value added activi- ties, and improving production cost, quality, and delivery. While the principles of lean are relatively constant, there are many different practices that have been implemented in the quest for value cre- ation in the manufacture of products, such as pull production, cellular flow, employee involvement, total productive maintenance, standardized work, and quality management (Doolen & Hacker, 2005). The successful application of various lean practices have been documented in many large manufac- turing plants within various industries, such as electronics, aerospace, computer manufactur- ing, and automotive assembly (Doolen & Hacker, 2005; Waurzyniak, 2005; MacDuffie, Sethuraman & Fisher 1996). These plants are typically char- acterized by substantial capital investment, mass production and a repetitive manufacturing envi- ronment. In spite of various data sources pointing to the significance of small manufacturing shops to the overall economy (Baker & McInturff, 2007; National Association of Manufacturers, 2001), still relatively little is known about lean practices in these kinds of shops, which are characterized by low volume, small to medium batch sizes, and one-of-a kind products. In a study conducted by James-Moore and Gibbons (1997), the authors have pointed out the lack of published work to explicitly

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture