LER Exam 3 Study Guide.docx - LER Exam 3 Study Guide Unit 1...

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LER Exam 3 Study Guide Unit 1: Labor History Conflict in the Labor Market: Employees: Want to sell their labor for as much as possible Employers: Want to buy labor for as little as possible “The workers desire to get as much as possible, the masters to give as little as possible. It is not, however, difficult to foresee which of the two parties must, upon all ordinary occasions, have the advantage in the dispute.” – Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations, 1776 Ways an Employee Can Influence What an Employer Pays: Find a better offer (EXIT!) Try to change the situation Individually??? Collectively (VOICE!) Employment Relations System A system by which employees and employers interact at the workplace to establish terms and conditions of employment Players: Employers Labor (employees and unions) Government (referee/regulator) The History of Employee-Employer Relations Late 1700s: Commerce evolves self-employed craftsman merchant-master Beginning of the Employer-Employer Relationship: When a Union was Formed First Union in America: Philadelphia Cordwainers (1794) First Strike in America: Philadelphia Cordwainers (1798) This lead to the Cordwainer/ Conspiracy Doctrine condemning strikes in 1806 Commonwealth v. Hunt (1842) established that not all strikes were conspiracies First National Unions (1860s) The National Labor Union The Holy and Noble Order of the Knights of Labor The Molly Maguires (1870s) Known for crushing miners’ union for years Emphasized growing strength of business Government-Business Conspiracy American Federation of Labor (1886): A federation of craft unions Pure and simple unionism Organize only skilled workers Work within the system Economic action (strike) Homestead Strike (Lockout)—1892, Pittsburgh Main players were Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick Amalgamated association of Iron, Steel, and Tin workers Broke the steel union Government-business conspiracy reinforced
Negative public reaction towards unions Use of strikebreakers Factors Influencing Employee-Employer Relations The state of the economy The attitude of the government Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W; “Wobblies”) Organize all workers one big union revolutionary overthrow the capitalist system whatever action necessary (strike, even violence) Crossroads: KOL and IWW revolution AFL work within the system American Federation of Labor (AFL): Samuel Gompers Unit 2: Labor Law and Organizing: How do Employees Form a Union? The Great Depression, October 1929 The New Deal, 1932 The National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act), 1935 Sec. 7: “employees shall have the right to organize a union, bargain collectively, and engage in concerted activities” Radical change The Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) is Born, 1935 Organized unions in the steel, auto, rubber, electrical, and other industries 1937: Employers continued to ignore the law and fight unions Memorial Day Massacre, Chicago Auto Workers form union at General Motors: engage in sit down strike in Flint, MI

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