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NAUXChange 2 Describe a job you held that wasn’t a “good fit” for you. Was it the tasks, the work environment, or the “culture”--in  other words, the shared values, beliefs, and rules in the organization--that made it a poor fit for you? Explain I held a position as a phlebotomist in a plasma donation center. When I applied for the job the company boosted  about team work within the company, excellence, commitment, effort and safety.  I was excited to be a part of a  company that was making lives better all over the world. When I started with the company I was told that they  currently didn’t have a trainer so I would have to train myself through reading standard operating procedures. I was  confident that I could handle the task and accepted the challenge. After I finished my readings I was asked to  demonstrate my abilities which I confidently did. I was put to work on the donation floor within a matter of a week. I’m  a positive person and enjoy interacting with people and offering encouragement; this was not something the other  phlebotomists disliked.  I was told to limit my interaction by the lead with the donors and not to smile or ask questions  aside from questions that were absolutely necessary. I found this approach to be too impersonal. I attempted to talk  with a manager but my requests went unanswered. After about 6 months I decided I didn’t enjoy working in an  environment that lacked kindness and a friendly attitude. It started to feel more like a prison then a workplace so I  decided to hang up my lab coat and resign. The mission was there but I felt the individual facility lacked an  interpersonal element.  Valerie Mingoes posted Sep 17, 2017 11:06 PM Subscribe Health care professionals practice in an environment that is complex, with many regulations, laws and standards of practice. Performing an abortion is legal but may not be considered ethical by other health care professionals or members of the public at large. Other ethical dilemmas arise at the end of life, when a decision must be made to turn off life-support machines and allow death to occur. Other common ethical issues a health care professional might face are confidentiality, relationships with patients and matters related to consent, especially in the treatment of minors Valerie, as a former healthcare professional I agree that the healthcare professional’s environment is indeed complex.

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