crito.ppt - A question of duty SOCRATES THE LAWS AND THE...

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SOCRATES, THE LAWS, AND THE PROBLEM OF PATRIOTISM A question of duty
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The scene… The possible location of Socrates’ prison cell (w/ child and kite)
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Crito’s reasoning Crito thinks Socrates should escape: “I think what you are doing isn’t just: throwing away your life, when you could save it, and hastening the very sort of fate for yourself that your enemies would hasten […] in their wish to destroy you. What’s more I think you’re also betraying those sons of yours by going away and deserting them when you could bring them up and educate them .” (45c-d, p 65)
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Socrates’ response “The most important thing isn’t living, but living well.” (48b) But, “living well, living a fine life, and living justly are the same.” Care for the soul So “there is nothing else to be examined besides the very thing we just mentioned: whether we […] will be acting justly if we pay money to those who would get me out of here and do them favor, or whether we will in truth be acting unjustly if we do these things.” (48c-d)
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The situation… What do you think? Should Socrates have escaped?
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The situation… What do you think? Should Socrates have escaped? Would you, if you were being punished for a crime you didn’t commit?
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The arguments of the Laws of Athens The Laws make three main arguments: The Argument from Harm The Obligation to Parents Analogy The Implicit Agreement Argument
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The Argument from Harm “Tell us, Socrates, what do you intend to do? Do you intend anything else by this act you’re attempting than to destroy us Laws, and the city as a whole, to the extent that you can? Or do you think a city can continue to exist and not be overthrown if the legal judgments rendered in it have no force, but are deprived of authority and undermined by the actions of private individuals?” (50a-b, p 72)
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