lecture 7 HW and natural selction

lecture 7 HW and natural selction - What happens to the...

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What happens to the frequency of a recessive allele over time? A.Stays the same B. Increases D. Decreases
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A Punnett square can predict the probability of offspring's genotype based on parents' genotype or the offsprings' genotype can be used to reveal the parents' genotype. Likewise, the Hardy- Weinberg principle can be used to calculate the frequency of particular alleles in a population based on frequency of, say, a recessive disease. The Hardy-Weinberg principle is like a Punnett square for populations, instead of individuals.
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Hardy–Weinberg principle for two alleles: the horizontal axis shows the two allele frequencies p and q , the vertical axis shows the genotype frequencies and the three possible genotypes are represented by the different glyphs.
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p 2 + 2pq + q 2 = 1 Frequency of alleles p = 0.5 q = ? Frequencies of genotypes? p 2 = 2pq = q 2 =
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In a population that is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the frequency of the allele "a" is 0.7. What is the percentage of the population that is heterozygous for this allele? A. 39 B. 21 C. 30 D. 42
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Which of the following is not a requirement for the maintenance of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium? A. random mating B. an increasing mutation rate C. large population size D. no migration E. no natural selection .
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In 1908 G. Hardy and W. Weinberg independently proposed that the frequency of alleles and genotypes in a population will remain constant from generation to generation if the population is stable and in genetic equilibrium. Five conditions are required in order for a population to remain at Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium: 1. A large breeding population 2. Random mating 3. No change in allelic frequency due to mutation 4. No immigration or emigration 5. No natural selection
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Assortive Mating
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Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium Simulation LINK
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understanding the causes of evolution. If the assumptions of H-W hold in a particular population, then the H-W principle tells us that after one generation of random mating, the population will be at equilibrium (i.e. the population will not change). In other words, the H-W principle tells us what to expect if a population is not evolving . If any of the assumptions are violated, then allele frequencies may change (i.e. the population may evolve). Investigation of the assumptions of H-W can help us to
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course BIOL 101 taught by Professor Annestork during the Fall '08 term at Ithaca College.

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lecture 7 HW and natural selction - What happens to the...

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