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Lecture 3 - Arguments An argument is an attempt to prove...

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Arguments An argument is an attempt to prove something. It consists of premises and a conclusion. The conclusion of an argument is the point that the argument is trying to prove. The premises of an argument are the reasons it provides for accepting its conclusion.
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Arguments: validity and soundness An argument is valid when there’s no way for all of the premises to be true while the conclusion is false. An argument is sound if it is valid and all of its premises are true.
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Arguments: Example #1 After she has the microchip implanted in her brain, Alice is not free. Even after she has the microchip implanted in her brain, Alice can still do whatever she wants to do, whenever she wants to do it. ----------------------------------------------------------- Therefore, being free is not the same thing as being able to whatever you want to do, whenever you want to do it.
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Arguments: Example #2 Ivan Ilyich has wealth, social esteem, and a high position. Ivan Ilyich does not live a good life. ----------------------------------------------------------
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