Lecture 2

Lecture 2 - Arguments An argument is an attempt to prove a...

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Arguments An argument is an attempt to prove a point. It consists of premises and a conclusion. The conclusion of an argument is the point that the argument is trying to prove. The premises of an argument are the reasons that the argument gives for accepting its conclusion.
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Thought experiments A thought experiment is a way of testing a philosophical hypothesis. Sometimes, doing a thought experiment can show you that a particular premise in an argument is true, and thereby help you to see that the conclusion of the argument is true.
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Example 1 Consider the philosophical hypothesis: Having freedom = being able to do whatever you want to do whenever you want to do it. Is this hypothesis true? No. Alice can do whatever she wants whenever she wants to. Alice is not free. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Therefore, freedom is not the same thing as being able to do whatever you want whenever you want to.
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Example 2 Consider the philosophical hypothesis:
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course PHIL 101 taught by Professor Neta during the Fall '07 term at UNC.

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Lecture 2 - Arguments An argument is an attempt to prove a...

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