ICT4D - Class 7b.pdf - Use of Geospatial Analysis for...

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Use of Geospatial Analysis for Community Level Hazard Mitigation Enhancement & Climate Change AdaptationDr. Tim FrazierGeorgetown University
IntroductionHuman-Environment GeographerNatural hazards & climate changeVulnerability & resilienceSpecialization in coastal hazards & coastal climate change impactsTheoretical Foundation:Political Ecology Structuration TheoryWorld Systems TheoryMixed methods approach GIS, spatial analysis, &geovisualization Stakeholder engagementPhysicalGIScienceHumanIntroduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
What do I mean by vulnerabilityVulnerability: the potential for loss Vulnerability is a function of exposure, sensitivity, & adaptive capacity Has both physical & social componentsSocial vulnerability - the product of social stratification & inequalities-Access to resources-Function of the demographics of the population (age, race, sex, etc.)-More complex constructs (health care, social capital, limited political & economic power, etc.)IntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
Variations in Community Exposure & Sensitivity to Tsunami Hazards in HawaiiDr. Nathan Wood, U.S. Geological SurveyDr. Tim Frazier, Penn State UniversityUSGS Technical Report - Wood et al 2007Hilo, Hawaii after the 1960 tsunamiIntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
Overlay Analysis for Hazard ExposureWood, Church, Frazier, & Yarnal (2007)IntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
Developed to integrate under-addressed concepts-Failure to do so can underestimate evacuation timeCustom travel demand model-Identifies evacuees based on variety of data-Can be altered to match assumptionsMulti-modal Evacuation ModelIntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
Simulation of pedestrian evacuation during a tsunami eventPathways developed using least path cost backlink rastersCalculate weighted flow accumulation by population for each path type -Ex. Total population -Over 65 & under 5, -Employees, -dependent care facilities, public venues, etc.Weighted Population Flow Paths:Age Under 65 (purple)Age Over 65 (blue)Base Population (green)Pedestrian Evacuation ModelIntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
Evacuation paths‘Evacuation-sheds’ to bridgesTravel time in ‘Evacuation-shed’Pedestrian Evacuation ModelIntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
Pedestrian Evacuation ModelIntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
Pedestrian Evacuation ModelIntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
Pedestrian Evacuation ModelIntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
Pedestrian Evacuation ModelStarting with Phase II - Participatory Mapping with Local StakeholdersIntroductionPrevious Research Current Research Future Research
SERV – Non - Traditional HazardsForest Service Project –Determine

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Term
Fall
Professor
Maria Trujillo
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