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ICT4D - Class 7b.pdf

ICT4D - Class 7b.pdf - Use of Geospatial Analysis for...

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Use of Geospatial Analysis for Community Level Hazard Mitigation Enhancement & Climate Change Adaptation Dr. Tim Frazier Georgetown University
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Introduction Human-Environment Geographer Natural hazards & climate change Vulnerability & resilience Specialization in coastal hazards & coastal climate change impacts Theoretical Foundation : Political Ecology Structuration Theory World Systems Theory Mixed methods approach GIS, spatial analysis, & geovisualization Stakeholder engagement Physical GIScience Human Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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What do I mean by vulnerability Vulnerability: the potential for loss Vulnerability is a function of exposure, sensitivity, & adaptive capacity Has both physical & social components Social vulnerability - the product of social stratification & inequalities - Access to resources - Function of the demographics of the population (age, race, sex, etc.) - More complex constructs (health care, social capital, limited political & economic power, etc.) Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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Variations in Community Exposure & Sensitivity to Tsunami Hazards in Hawaii Dr. Nathan Wood, U.S. Geological Survey Dr. Tim Frazier, Penn State University USGS Technical Report - Wood et al 2007 Hilo, Hawaii after the 1960 tsunami Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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Overlay Analysis for Hazard Exposure Wood, Church, Frazier, & Yarnal (2007) Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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Developed to integrate under-addressed concepts - Failure to do so can underestimate evacuation time Custom travel demand model - Identifies evacuees based on variety of data - Can be altered to match assumptions Multi-modal Evacuation Model Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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Simulation of pedestrian evacuation during a tsunami event Pathways developed using least path cost backlink rasters Calculate weighted flow accumulation by population for each path type - Ex. Total population - Over 65 & under 5, - Employees, - dependent care facilities, public venues, etc. Weighted Population Flow Paths: Age Under 65 (purple) Age Over 65 (blue) Base Population (green) Pedestrian Evacuation Model Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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Evacuation paths ‘Evacuation-sheds’ to bridges Travel time in ‘Evacuation-shed’ Pedestrian Evacuation Model Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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Pedestrian Evacuation Model Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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Pedestrian Evacuation Model Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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Pedestrian Evacuation Model Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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Pedestrian Evacuation Model Starting with Phase II - Participatory Mapping with Local Stakeholders Introduction Previous Research Current Research Future Research
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SERV – Non - Traditional Hazards Forest Service Project – Determine
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  • Fall '17
  • Maria Trujillo

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