CUTTING_TOOLS.pdf - Manufacturing Engineering Technician...

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Manufacturing Engineering Technician 4-1
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29-2 CUTTING TOOLS
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Manufacturing Engineering Text Book Chapter 23 Page 628 29-3
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VIDEO Tool Geometry is very important! You will see on the following video that removing the chip(s) is important. CLEARANCES on tooling must be accomplished. Watch This Video 29-4
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Remember Heat is your Enemy! 29-5 VIDEO
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29-6 Objectives Use the nomenclature of a cutting-tool point Explain the purpose of each type of rake and clearance angle Identify the applications of various types of cutting-tool materials Describe the cutting action on different types of machines
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29-7 Cutting Tools One of most important components in machining process Performance will determine efficiency of operation Two basic types (excluding abrasives) Single point and multi point Must have rake and clearance angles ground or formed on them
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29-8 Multi Point Single Point
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29-9 Cutting-Tool Materials Lathe toolbits generally made of five materials High-speed steel Cast alloys (such as Stellite) Cemented carbides Ceramics Cermets More exotic materials are finding wide use Borazon and Polycrystalline Diamond ** Chapter 22 Page - 600
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29-10 Lathe Toolbit Properties Hardness Page 600 Wear-resistant Capable of maintaining a red hardness during machining operation Red hardness: ability of cutting tool to maintain sharp cutting edge even when turns red because of high heat during cutting Able to withstand shock during cutting Shaped so edge can penetrate work
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INTRODUCTION 29-11 VIDEO
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29-12 High-Speed Steel Toolbits May contain combinations of tungsten, chromium, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt Can take heavy cuts, withstand shock and maintain sharp cutting edge under red heat Generally two types (general purpose) Molybdenum-base (Group M) Tungsten-base (Group T) Cobalt added if more red hardness desired
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H.S.S Toolbits P.604 2 Types: 1) Group T1 TUNGSTEN general purpose! Based 18 4 1 12% - 18% - (W) Tungsten , (Cr) 4% Chromium , (V) 1% Vanadium , (Co) Cobalt Carbide 10% - 12% 2) Group M1 95% most widely used! MOLYBDENUM Based - 8 4 1 (Mo) 8% - Molybdenum , (Cr) 4% Chromium , (V) 1% Vandium , Tungsten , Cobalt 29-13
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29-14 Cast Alloy Toolbits - Stellite Usually contain Co(Cobalt) 38% - 53% ,Cr (Chromium) 30% to 33%, W (Tungsten) 10% to 20% and Carbide 1% to 3% Qualities High hardness High resistance to wear Excellent red-hardness Operate 2 ½ times speed of high-speed steel Weaker and more brittle than high-speed steel Page 605
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29-15 Cemented-Carbide Toolbits Capable of cutting speeds 5 to 10 times higher than high-speed steel toolbits Low toughness but high hardness and excellent red-hardness Consist of tungsten carbide sintered in cobalt matrix Straight tungsten used to machine cast iron and nonferrous materials (crater easily) Different grades for different work
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29-16
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