Lab Report Project 11.docx

Lab Report Project 11.docx - Identification Properties and...

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Identification, Properties, and Synthesis of an Unknown Ionic Compound Allex Derus CH1011-012_129B Instructor: Wan Wang September 29, 2016 My signature indicates that this document represents my own work. Excluding shared data, the information, thoughts and ideas are my own, except as indicated in the references.
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Discussion In the lab experiment, the goals are to examine and figure out the exact identity of a specific unknown ionic compound by testing its properties. To do this, one needs to use multiple tests to examine the substance. These tests include solubility, the flame color test, the anionic test, the pH test, qualitative, quantitative, and the conductivity test. One also needs to test known compounds to compare the results of the known compound to the unknown compound. The unknown compound was composed of grainy, white crystals that look similar to sugar. In week 1, when experimenting with the flame test, the compound had a flame color of bright orange and had a high intensity as indicated in Table 1. This information indicated that the unknown compound had the element of sodium. With this information, one can figure out that from a list of compounds, the compound has to have the element sodium. The unknown compound is soluble in water. When tested with other compounds, most of the known compounds are soluble, but barium sulfate which is not soluble in water. This information can be found in Table 4. Once one finds out the solubility of the unknown compound, one needs to test how much of a substance can be put into water before it becomes insoluble. Other liquids can be used, but in this experiment, water was used. Any amount of compounds can be tested, but in this experiment, four were tested. In water, a determination of the quantitative solubility of the unknown compound became insoluble at 37.5 grams. According to Table 5 , sodium chloride is the closest compound to being insoluble around the same time the unknown is. With this information, one can conclude that the unknown substance is an ionic salt that is soluble in water. There are a variety of tests one must test to figure out the anions of a compound. One must test for a sulfate, a chloride, a nitrate, a carbonate, and an acetate. Throughout all of the tests, the person doing the experiment must use the unknown compound in all the tests and figure out which test reacts with the unknown. In this experiment, according to Table 2 , Chloride was the only test that did what was described in the lab manual. Through a process of elimination, one can conclude that the unknown substance would have to be sodium chloride (NaCl), but one
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