Carlene final exam - Carlene Harriott U.S History I Professor Matthew Dunne 10 December 2017 Emancipation Proclamation Prior to Emancipation

Carlene final exam - Carlene Harriott U.S History I...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 3 pages.

Carlene Harriott U.S. History I Professor Matthew Dunne 10 December 2017 Emancipation Proclamation Prior to Emancipation Proclamation, America was divided between the Northern and Southern states. Southern states that depended solely on plantation system and Northern States that were industrial based. In addition, problems were brewing with regards to state vs. federal powers, as well as the whole issue of slave and free states. These problems led to years of conflict. It was within this time frame, 1860, that President Abraham Lincoln was elected and several southern states disaffiliate from the union, forming the confederate states. Slaves were used by confederate states to support their armies, consequentially, they played an important part within the wars. With Abraham Lincoln interest at heart being to save the union, he resorted to finding a way to cripple the use of slaves by confederate states within wars. As a result the Emancipation Proclamation was borned. This proclamation was issued on January 1, 1863 by Abraham Lincoln. The declaration read, “all persons held as slaves within any states or designated part of a state, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free. Simple put slaves within the Confederate States were declared free. The Emancipation Proclamation was significant to American history as it was the gateway to total abolition of slavery within the United States. War of 1812 The war of 1812 was an armed conflict between United States and Great Britain. Prior to the war of 1812, America was at the forefront of trade with French and Spanish territories within the Caribbean, mainly because of the ongoing hostility between France and Britain. Britain saw it necessary to impede American trade with France, because they were at war, and simple viewed this as threat to their maritime supremacy. In addition, the British government also practiced impressment. In

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture