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pylabreport - Measurement of Mass Length and Time Lab...

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Measurement of Mass, Length, and Time Lab Report Author: Colleen Doorhy Partner: Brittany Denning, Barbara Hoskins PY 211 Sec 220 TA: Eli Owens Performed: August 27, 2007 Submitted: September 4, 2007
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I. Introduction A. Objective: The purpose of this experiment was to become acquainted with basic scientific conventions for measuring physical quantities and for analyzing the data obtained from those measurements. This lab has two separate activities. The first concentrated on finding mathematical relationships between measured quantities and the second includes taking uncertainties to mind when analyzing measurements. The objective of the first activity was to analyze the data to find a mathematical relationship between a pendulum’s period and its length. The objective of the second activity was to determine the weight of the metal and the experimental uncertainties by direct calculation and graphical analysis. B. Theory: There are some degrees of “uncertainty” of measurement. By convention we say that the uncertainty associated with a measuring device is one-half of the smallest division on that measuring device. This is named “Propagation of Uncertainty” or “Propagation of Error.” If one was measuring with a meter stick, the smallest division would be 1 mm. Say the length of the object was .6843 m, then the value would be . 6843+-.0005 m. Also, if one was to measure the degree of uncertainty of density, take the density equation: D=M/V and convert it to II. Methods and Materials A. Equipment: The apparatus used is this experiment was a simple pendulum consisting of a stand, wax string, a washer, and a large protractor. In the first activity a stopwatch from an internet site was used and a meter stick. An aluminum weight, vernier calipers, and a scale were used in the second activity. Figure 1 shows vernier calipers and Figure 2 shows a diagram of the simple pendulum set up. Figure 1 Figure 2
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B. Procedure For activity one, the length of each pendulum was measured with a meter stick (L), the distance from the point where the string pivots to the center of the washer, with each group having a relatively longer length of pendulum. A large protractor was placed at the point of attachment of the string to make sure the pendulum was not pulled back more than ten degrees. The pendulum was pulled back and released while an internet stopwatch timed the thirty complete oscillations. Then, the period (T) of one oscillation was calculated by dividing the time determined for thirty complete oscillations and the number thirty. Such that, T=time of 30 oscillations/30. Next, a table was made on the board to compare and contrast all of the other lab groups’ data. Using Excel, each group
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course PY 211 taught by Professor Owen during the Fall '07 term at N.C. State.

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pylabreport - Measurement of Mass Length and Time Lab...

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