Importance of insects.docx

Importance of insects.docx - Importance of insects Food...

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Importance of insects Food production – honey Insects as human food Pollination Detritus Megadiversity Population regulation Parasitoids Predators Products Silk Shellac Cochineal Negatives: Disease vectors Agricultural pests Drosophila melanogaster (not sure what this is. Correct me if it's in the wrong category.) Most successful : Herbivores- eat plants Scavengers&Decomposers- eat waste products Parasites- Ecological Diversity: Why are there so many insects? Fill many niches (ways of making a living) Tiny- environment can support more individuals Need fewer resources Exoskeleton: Protection from predators & harsh environments Water retention Flight: Mobility Escape predators New resources Developmental Plasticity: Reproductive Output: Fast Lots Telescoping generations (adults having babies having babies) Page Break Topics of Biology Bio-1117-01 Dr. Holly Martinson 28 August 2017
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1. What is an insect? a. Class Insecta i. 6 legs (hexapods) ii. 3 main body sections 1. Head 2. Thorax a. All legs come from thorax b. Similar to human chest 3. Abdomen iii. 2 antennae iv. External mouthpiece 2. Types of Metamorphosis (change in body form) b. Ametabolous development (=no metamorphosis) v. Body shape stays the same, only gets bigger c. Hemimetabolous development (=) vi. Nymphs (babies) show gradual development of adult structures vii. Adults don’t molt 1. Molting = shedding old external skeletons d. Holometabolous development viii. Larvae are completely different from adults ix. These insects have division of labor processes x. These insects do not compete for resources xi. Only adults have wings 3. Measures of Success e. Ecological Diversity xii. Everywhere except marines 4. Why are there so many insect species? f. Fill many niches (ways of asking a living) g. Tiny environments can support many individuals and types of species h. Small size means they need less resources i. Exoskeleton xiii. protect insects from predators, xiv. environmental condition, xv. water retention j. flight xvi. mobility 1. Escape predators 2. New resources k. Developmental plasticity xvii. When the conditions start to change, the new generations can change their shape l. Behavioral plasticity xviii. When conditions start to decline they can change their behavior to adapt m. Reproduction output xix. Fast - five days 3. Telescoping generations
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  • Spring '14
  • Thorington
  • Biology, Insects

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