ch7 - This is Recruiting Motivating and Keeping Quality Employees chapter 7 from the book An Introduction to Business(index.html(v 2.0 This book is

ch7 - This is Recruiting Motivating and Keeping Quality...

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This is “Recruiting, Motivating, and Keeping Quality Employees”, chapter 7 from the book An Introduction to Business (index.html) (v. 2.0). This book is licensed under a Creative Commons by-nc-sa 3.0 ( 3.0/) license. See the license for more details, but that basically means you can share this book as long as you credit the author (but see below), don't make money from it, and do make it available to everyone else under the same terms. This content was accessible as of December 29, 2012, and it was downloaded then by Andy Schmitz () in an effort to preserve the availability of this book. Normally, the author and publisher would be credited here. However, the publisher has asked for the customary Creative Commons attribution to the original publisher, authors, title, and book URI to be removed. Additionally, per the publisher's request, their name has been removed in some passages. More information is available on this project's attribution page () . For more information on the source of this book, or why it is available for free, please see the project's home page () . You can browse or download additional books there. i
Howard Schultz toasts at the launch of their new “everyday” brew, Pike Place Roast, April 8, 2008, in Bryant Park in New York City. Chapter 7 Recruiting, Motivating, and Keeping Quality Employees The Grounds of a Great Work Environment Howard Schultz has vivid memories of his father slumped on the couch with his leg in a cast.Introductory material on Howard Schultz and Starbucks comes from Howard Schultz and Dori Jones Yang, Pour Your Heart into It: How Starbucks Built a Company One Cup at a Time (New York: Hyperion, 1997), 3–8. The ankle would heal, but his father had lost another job—this time as a driver for a diaper service. It was a crummy job; still, it put food on the table, and if his father couldn’t work, there wouldn’t be any money. Howard was seven, but he understood the gravity of the situation, particularly because his mother was seven months pregnant, and the family had no insurance. This was just one of the many setbacks that plagued Schultz’s father throughout his life—an honest, hard-working man frustrated by a system that wasn’t designed to cater to the needs of common workers. He’d held a series of blue-collar jobs (cab driver, truck driver, factory worker), sometimes holding two or three at a time. Despite his willingness to work, he never earned enough money to move his family out of Brooklyn’s federally subsidized housing projects. Schultz’s father died never having found fulfillment in his work life—or even a meaningful job. It was the saddest day of Howard’s life.

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