_Caged Bird Narrative Coping.pdf

_Caged Bird Narrative Coping.pdf - Hailey Christoph Mr...

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Hailey Christoph Mr. Shogren Honors English II 18th March 2016 Coping About a year and a half ago, my dog, Ivy, had a lump growing in the side of her mouth. I was the first one to notice, but I didn’t tell anyone because I didn’t think anything of it. It gradually got bigger and bigger, and as it got bigger my concern grew. My mom noticed it too, eventually. Once my mom noticed it, she became almost as concerned as I was. At that point, my entire family knew about it, like a bad secret that nobody was supposed to know. My mother told us she would take Ivy to the vet about 2 weeks later. At the vet, they took a biopsy to see if her lump was cancerous and told us that they would let us know in about a week. The anxiety I felt was overwhelming. I couldn’t stop thinking about it. Then, There was a call. My mom picked up the house phone and I watched her as she talked to the vet. “Okay, thanks” My mom says, hanging up the phone. She looks at me with complete worry. “So, is it cancerous?” I ask, hoping that the answer was no. “Yes.” She replies. Right at that moment, my whole world stopped. She was my baby, my world, my dog. How could this happen? How could this happen to MY dog? How could my best friend get cancer? Why was life so unfair? Had she done anything to get this? Could I have stopped this from happening? Would it kill her? These questions filled my mind and my brain felt jumbled and unorganized like puzzle pieces being poured out from a box.I felt betrayed and hurt and started to cry. I went to Ivy and hugged her as hard as I could. Fear consumed all four feet eleven inches of my body. My mom assured me that we could get her tumor removed, but that the cancer wouldn’t get removed so the tumor would surely grow back. We took her to the vet about 2 weeks later after my mom had scheduled an appointment.
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My heart was beating so fast in my chest because I knew that she could die from this surgery. After all, she was 12 years old, and pretty weak. Thankfully, she survived her 3 hour surgery. She was my little survivor. When she came out of the surgery, she was disoriented and bleeding a bit. It hurt me to see her that way and I felt like all of it was my fault. It hurt me to see her in such pain. She was just an innocent dog who didn’t do anything wrong. She recovered well and was fine. She fought and she fought hard. She was a soldier who just got shot and got back up again to keep fighting. I was relieved when I saw my girl come back. I was happy and content until a few months later, when her tumor grew back. With each passing day, my concern grew and grew. My mom said she would take Ivy to the vet after I had told her it was growing back.
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