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Psychology Applied to Modern Life: Adjustment in the 21st Century
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Chapter 4 / Exercise 1
Psychology Applied to Modern Life: Adjustment in the 21st Century
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Unformatted text preview: 1. Variables ○ Independent:​​ ​The​ ​Cause ○ Dependent:​​ ​The​ ​Effect 2. Various​ ​research​ ​methods ○ Field​ ​Research:​​ ​A​ ​researcher​ ​directly​ ​observes​ ​people​ ​in​ ​their​ ​natural setting Advantages​:​ ​Provides​ ​detailed​ ​understanding​ ​of​ ​people's​ ​everyday lives Disadvantages​:​ ​Time​ ​consuming/​ ​difficult​ ​to​ ​replicate/​ ​difficult​ ​to generalize​ ​to​ ​other​ ​groups/​ ​prone​ ​to​ ​ethical​ ​issues ○ Survey​ ​Research:​ ​Data​ ​collected​ ​through​ ​questionnaires​ ​or​ ​interviews. Advantages​:​ ​Large​ ​populations​ ​can​ ​be​ ​studied/​ ​results​ ​can​ ​be generalized Disadvantages​:​ ​does​ ​not​ ​provide​ ​in​ ​depth​ ​information​ ​regarding people’s​ ​behavior ○ Experiment:​​ ​A​ ​research​ ​situation​ ​designed​ ​to​ ​elicit​ ​some​ ​sort​ ​of​ ​behavior under​ ​closely​ ​controlled​ ​lab​ ​circumstances Advantages​:​ ​Experimenter​ ​is​ ​able​ ​to​ ​control​ ​other​ ​variables/​ ​Easy to​ ​replicate Disadvantages​:​ ​Not​ ​a​ ​natural​ ​environment/​ ​not​ ​all​ ​concepts​ ​can​ ​be measured​ ​in​ ​a​ ​lab 3. Causality​ ​and​ ​correlation ○ Causality​:​ ​Variable​ ​A​ ​causes​ ​Variable​ ​B.​ ​(Cause​ ​and​ ​effect) ○ Correlation​:​ ​Both​ ​variable​ ​A​ ​and​ ​variable​ ​B​ ​are​ ​observed​ ​at​ ​the​ ​same time. 4. Material​ ​and​ ​non-material​ ​culture ○ Material​ ​Culture:​ ​Physical​ ​objects​ ​that​ ​shape​ ​or​ ​relect​ ​the​ ​member’s​ ​lives in​ ​a​ ​society​ ​(Cars,​ ​Clothing,​ ​Cell​ ​phones,​ ​Coin​ ​Currency) ○ NonMaterial​ ​Culture:​ ​Intangible​ ​products​ ​thats​ ​shape​ ​society​ ​and​ ​are shared​ ​by​ ​its​ ​members​ ​(beliefs,​ ​values,​ ​norms,​ ​customs) How​ ​do​ ​they​ ​change​ ​at​ ​different​ ​rates? As​ ​material/​ ​non​ ​material​ ​culture​ ​evolves​ ​the​ ​three​ ​largest​ ​factors​ ​of​ ​its rate​ ​of​ ​change​ ​include​ ​the​ ​Economy​,​ ​The​ ​law​ ​and​ ​politics​​ ​of​ ​the​ ​time,​ ​and​ ​the media’s​​ ​role​ ​in​ ​advertising​ ​said​ ​material​ ​culture. ​ ​Why​ ​do​ ​they? The​ ​evolution​ ​of​ ​material​ ​and​ ​nonmaterial​ ​culture​ ​happen​ ​when​ ​changes in​ ​the​ ​economy​ ​force​ ​evolution​ ​of​ ​primarily​ ​material​ ​culture​ ​(Depresssion​ ​means we​ ​cant​ ​afford​ ​big​ ​houses​ ​and​ ​nice​ ​cars),​ ​when​ ​laws​ ​are​ ​passed​ ​to​ ​inhibit​ ​or allow​ ​both​ ​material​ ​and​ ​nonmaterial​ ​culture​ ​(​ ​Legalization​ ​of​ ​gay​ ​marriage, Legalization​ ​of​ ​marijuana),​ ​and​ ​when​ ​the​ ​media​ ​is​ ​lobbied​ ​to​ ​or​ ​against​ ​certain ideals​ ​affecting​ ​both​ ​material​ ​and​ ​nonmaterial​ ​culture​ ​(Black​ ​lives​ ​matter movement​ ​as​ ​a​ ​result​ ​of​ ​media​ ​coverage). 5. Nature​ ​vs.​ ​Nurture ○ Nature:​ ​Biological​ ​factors​ ​determine​ ​who​ ​we​ ​are ○ Nurture:​ ​Social​ ​and​ ​environmental​ ​factors​ ​determine​ ​who​ ​we​ ​are ○ What​ ​were​ ​the​ ​disagreements​ ​associated​ ​with​ ​the​ ​debate? Nature​ ​theorists​ believe​ ​that​ ​genes​ ​play​ ​the​ ​primary​ ​role​ ​in​ ​how​ ​our personalities​ ​take​ ​shape​ ​whereas​ ​nurture​ ​theorists​ ​believe environmental​ ​and​ ​social​ ​factors​ ​are​ ​what​ ​plays​ ​the​ ​biggest​ ​role​ ​in shaping​ ​who​ ​we​ ​are​ ​as​ ​people. ○ What​ ​solutions​ ​would​ ​nature​ ​and​ ​nurture​ ​theories​ ​offer​ ​for poverty​ ​and​ ​crime? Nature​ ​theorists​ ​would​ ​say​ ​there​ ​are​ ​genes​ ​that​ ​would​ ​predispose certain​ ​groups​ ​to​ ​commit​ ​crimes​ ​such​ ​as​ ​murder.​ ​Nurture​ ​theorists would​ ​say​ ​environmental​ ​and​ ​social​ ​factors​ ​push​ ​people​ ​to​ ​commit crimes​ ​they​ ​would​ ​not​ ​have,​ ​had​ ​they​ ​been​ ​raised​ ​in​ ​a​ ​different setting. 6. Socialization:​​ ​Process​ ​through​ ​which​ ​one​ ​learns​ ​how​ ​to​ ​act​ ​according​ ​to​ ​the rules​ ​and​ ​expectations​ ​of​ ​a​ ​particular​ ​culture. 7. Agents​ ​of​ ​socialization:​ ​family,​ ​friends,​ ​peers,​ ​teammates,​ ​ ​teachers,​ ​religious institutions,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​media. ○ How​ ​have​ ​these​ ​changed​ ​over​ ​time? Over​ ​time​ ​as​ ​values​ ​shift​ ​and​ ​material​ ​and​ ​nonmaterial​ ​culture change,​ ​the​ ​primary​ ​agents​ ​of​ ​socialization​ ​also​ ​change. 8. Difference​ ​between​ ​sex​ ​and​ ​gender ○ Sex:​ ​Defined​ ​by​ ​the​ ​anatomy​ ​of​ ​ones​ ​reproductive​ ​system​ ​and​ ​secondary sex​ ​characteristics. ○ Gender:​ ​The​ ​social​ ​role​ ​assigned​ ​through​ ​either​ ​sex​ ​or​ ​personal identification. 9. Mead’s​ ​view​ ​of​ ​the​ ​self ○ “I”:​ ​The​ ​id ○ “Me”:​ ​The​ ​Super​ ​ego ○ Generalized​ ​other:​ ​Perspective​ ​of​ ​the​ ​larger​ ​society​ ​and​ ​its​ ​values and​ ​attitudes ○ Role​ ​taking:​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​see​ ​ones​ ​self​ ​from​ ​the​ ​perspective​ ​of​ ​others. 10. Cooley’s​ ​stages​ ​of​ ​acquisition​ ​of​ ​self ○ Recognition​ ​of​ ​oneself​ ​as​ ​distinct​ ​from​ ​others ○ Language​ ​acquisition ○ Development​ ​of​ ​looking​ ​glass​ ​self 11. Looking-glass​ ​self​ ​(3​ ​parts) ○ Our​ ​perception​ ​of​ ​how​ ​we​ ​appear​ ​to​ ​other​ ​people ○ Our​ ​estimate​ ​of​ ​the​ ​judgement​ ​others​ ​make​ ​on​ ​us ○ The​ ​emotional​ ​feeling​ ​of​ ​this​ ​judgement 12. Goffman​ ​and​ ​presentation​ ​of​ ​self ○ Impression​ ​management​ ​(people​ ​trying​ ​to​ ​present​ ​a​ ​favorable​ ​image​ ​of themselves) i. Goal​ ​of​ ​impression​ ​management​ ​is​ ​to​ ​increase​ ​likelihood​ ​of obtaining​ ​favorable​ ​outcomes 13. Face​ ​Work​ ​-​ ​t​he​ ​identity​ ​you​ ​claim​ ​in​ ​a​ ​social​ ​situation ○ Defensive​ ​-​ ​stuff​ ​you​ ​do​ ​to​ ​maintain​ ​your​ ​image ○ Protective​ ​-​ ​stuff​ ​you​ ​do​ ​to​ ​maintain​ ​the​ ​image​ ​of​ ​those​ ​around​ ​you ○ How​ ​does​ ​this​ ​relate​ ​to​ ​social​ ​stability​ ​and​ ​predictability?​ ​It maintains​ ​social​ ​stability​ ​because​ ​people​ ​are​ ​going​ ​to​ ​strive​ ​to uphold​ ​a​ ​certain​ ​image​ ​without​ ​changing.​ ​If​ ​things​ ​don’t​ ​change you​ ​can​ ​predict​ ​they​ ​will​ ​remain​ ​stable. 14. Dramaturgy​ ​-​ ​the​ ​study​ ​of​ ​social​ ​life​ ​as​ ​theater ○ Front​ ​stage​ ​-​ ​where​ ​appropriate​ ​appearance​ ​is​ ​maintained ○ Back​ ​stage​ ​-​ ​where​ ​preparation​ ​for​ ​performance​ ​is​ ​made​ ​and where​ ​impression​ ​management​ ​can​ ​be​ ​relaxed 15. What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​status​ ​of​ ​family​ ​in​ ​contemporary​ ​society?​ ​How​ ​does​ ​child rearing​ ​and​ ​marriage​ ​look​ ​differently​ ​than​ ​it​ ​did​ ​in​ ​pre-modern​ ​society? ○ In​ ​a​ ​traditional​ ​society​ ​the​ ​siblings​ ​raised​ ​the​ ​children.​ ​In​ ​a​ ​contemporary society​ ​the​ ​whole​ ​family​ ​collectively​ ​raises​ ​the​ ​children. jj 16. What​ ​is​ ​neo-localism​ ​and​ ​how​ ​is​ ​it​ ​related​ ​to​ ​other​ ​social​ ​institutions? ○ Economy 17. Deviance​ ​–​ ​what​ ​is​ ​it?​ ​Mild?​ ​Severe? Deviance​ ​is​ ​anything​ ​that​ ​goes​ ​against​ ​social​ ​norms,​ ​they​ ​don’t necessarily​ ​have​ ​to​ ​be​ ​bad.​ ​Mild​ ​deviance​ ​would​ ​be​ ​something​ ​like​ ​stealing​ ​or​ ​lying​ ​and severe​ ​deviance​ ​would​ ​be​ ​murder,​ ​for​ ​example. 18. According​ ​to​ ​functionalism,​ ​what​ ​positive​ ​things​ ​emerge​ ​from​ ​deviance for​ ​society?​ ​Deviance​ ​can​ ​bring​ ​society​ ​closer​ ​together​ ​by​ ​outlining​ ​the​ ​type of​ ​behavior​ ​that​ ​isnt​ ​acceptable​ ​in​ ​our​ ​society. 19. Merton’s​ ​Strain​ ​theory​ ​–​ ​what​ ​is​ ​the​ ​strain?​ ​-Deviance​ ​occurs​ ​when culturally​ ​approved​ ​goals​ ​cannot​ ​be​ ​achieved​ ​by​ ​culturally​ ​approved​ ​means. ○ Socially​ ​approved​ ​goals​ ​:​ ​(example)​ ​graduating​ ​college​ ​and​ ​getting a​ ​job ○ Socially​ ​approved​ ​means​ ​-​ ​working​ ​towards​ ​an​ ​ultimate​ ​goal​ ​and reaching​ ​it,​ ​getting​ ​a​ ​job,​ ​saving​ ​money,​ ​buying​ ​a​ ​house. ○ How​ ​does​ ​strain​ ​theory​ ​help​ ​functionalism’s​ ​ability​ ​to​ ​explain​ ​social change?​ ​It​ ​does​ ​the​ ​do​ ​by​ ​doing​ ​the​ ​does​ ​when​ ​the​ ​doesnt​ ​does the​ ​do. 20. Conflict​ ​perspective​ ​on​ ​deviance​ ​and​ ​crime ○ How​ ​does​ ​defining​ ​deviance​ ​relate​ ​to​ ​power​ ​and​ ​stratification​ ​in society?​ ​Who​ ​or​ ​what​ ​is​ ​labeled​ ​depends​ ​on​ ​power​ ​of​ ​groups​ ​and individuals.​ ​When​ ​asked​ ​to​ ​describe​ ​crimes,​ ​people​ ​usually associate​ ​them​ ​to​ ​people​ ​of​ ​lower​ ​status/income. 21. Costs​ ​of​ ​“street​ ​crime”​ ​and​ ​white​ ​collar​ ​crime ○ Street​ ​crimes​ ​cost​ ​the​ ​U.S​ ​an​ ​annual​ ​cost​ ​of​ ​$3.8​ ​billion​ ​and​ ​white​ ​collar crimes​ ​can​ ​cost​ ​an​ ​annual​ ​total​ ​of​ ​$500​ ​billion Supplemental​ ​Readings:​ ​Questions​ ​relating​ ​to​ ​each​ ​of​ ​the​ ​supplemental​ ​reading assigned​ ​will​ ​be​ ​asked​ ​on​ ​the​ ​exam.​ ​ ​Supplemental​ ​reading​ ​questions​ ​will​ ​weigh​ ​more than​ ​the​ ​questions​ ​from​ ​the​ ​textbook​ ​chapters​ ​and​ ​lecture. 1. In​ ​The​ ​Ties​ ​that​ ​Bind​ ​are​ ​Fraying​,​ ​what​ ​is​ ​the​ ​conclusion​ ​about​ ​the​ ​state of​ ​our​ ​intimate​ ​connections?​ ​Is​ ​this​ ​an​ ​issue​ ​of​ ​concern? a. ng-4-flash-cards/ b. People​ ​have​ ​less​ ​confidants;​ ​yes​ ​it​ ​is​ ​a​ ​concern​ ​because​ ​if​ ​no​ ​one​ ​has anyone​ ​to​ ​talk​ ​to​ ​they​ ​may​ ​resort​ ​to​ ​violent/depressed​ ​behavior 2. What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​connection​ ​between​ ​norms​ ​and​ ​morality?​ ​(​The​ ​Good,​ ​the Bad,​ ​and​ ​the​ ​Social​) 3. 4. 5. 6. a. If​ ​something​ ​is​ ​a​ ​norm​ ​than​ ​it​ ​is​ ​most​ ​likely​ ​morally​ ​acceptable What​ ​weaknesses​ ​can​ ​surveys​ ​have?​ ​Are​ ​they​ ​easy​ ​to​ ​spot? a. Validity b. Superficial c. Self-reports d. Low​ ​response​ ​rates e. can​ ​not​ ​provide​ ​in-depth​ ​information​ ​about​ ​people’s​ ​behavior​ ​or experiences - THey​ ​are​ ​not​ ​easy​ ​to​ ​spot What​ ​is​ ​the​ ​central​ ​question​ ​in​ ​the​ ​article​ ​Do​ ​video​ ​games​ ​kill​?​ ​How​ ​is​ ​it related​ ​to​ ​causality? a. The​ ​central​ ​question​ ​is​ ​do​ ​video​ ​games​ ​cause​ ​violent​ ​behaviour​ ​and​ ​the potential​ ​to​ ​kill?​ ​Its​ ​not​ ​more​ ​of​ ​causality​ ​its​ ​more​ ​of​ ​correlation In​ ​The​ ​economy​ ​that​ ​never​ ​sleeps​,​ ​what​ ​are​ ​some​ ​of​ ​the​ ​negative side-effects​ ​discussed?​ ​How​ ​does​ ​the​ ​economy​ ​that​ ​never​ ​sleeps represent​ ​the​ ​defeat​ ​of​ ​tradition? a. The​ ​traditional​ ​household​ ​has​ ​a​ ​man​ ​working​ ​and​ ​the​ ​wife​ ​stays​ ​home​ ​and does​ ​houseworks/raise​ ​kids.​ ​The​ ​defeat​ ​of​ ​tradition​ ​is​ ​that​ ​now​ ​both parents​ ​are​ ​working​ ​long​ ​hours​ ​to​ ​support​ ​their​ ​families.​ ​Both​ ​parents arent​ ​getting​ ​enough​ ​sleep,​ ​kids​ ​are​ ​eating​ ​dinner​ ​alone, Contemporary​ ​couples​ ​emphasize​ ​what​ ​kinds​ ​of​ ​characteristics​ ​in​ ​a mate,​ ​according​ ​to​ ​the​ ​Changing​ ​Landscape​ ​of​ ​Love​ ​and​ ​Marriage​? What​ ​does​ ​this​ ​say​ ​about​ ​marriage​ ​as​ ​a​ ​social​ ​institution​ ​in​ ​modern societies? a. both​ ​male​ ​and​ ​female​ ​students​ ​rank​ ​mutual​ ​love​ ​and​ ​attraction​ ​as​ ​more important​ ​today​ ​than​ ​in​ ​earlier​ ​decades.​ ​Changing​ ​gender​ ​roles​ ​also translated​ ​into​ ​changes​ ​in​ ​mate​ ​preferences​ ​across​ ​the​ ​decades,​ ​with women’s​ ​financial​ ​prospects​ ​becoming​ ​more​ ​important​ ​to​ ​men​ ​and​ ​men’s ambition​ ​and​ ​industriousness​ ​becoming​ ​less​ ​important​ ​to​ ​women.​ ​Overall, differences​ ​in​ ​the​ ​qualities​ ​men​ ​and​ ​women​ ​are​ ​looking​ ​for​ ​in​ ​a​ ​mate declined​ ​in​ ​the​ ​second​ ​half​ ​of​ ​the​ ​20th​ ​century,​ ​suggesting​ ​that​ ​being​ ​male or​ ​female​ ​has​ ​become​ ​a​ ​less​ ​important​ ​factor​ ​in​ ​determining​ ​what​ ​young people​ ​look​ ​for​ ​in​ ​intimate​ ​partnerships’ b. Both​ ​value​ ​love​ ​affection​ ​and​ ​long​ ​marriage​ ​but​ ​women​ ​value​ ​them​ ​more c. In​ ​a​ ​modern​ ​society​ ​Americans​ ​still​ ​place​ ​a​ ​high​ ​value​ ​on​ ​traditional, romantic​ ​love​ ​ideals​ ​for​ ​their​ ​relationships,​ ​including​ ​the​ ​ideal​ ​of​ ​lifelong marriage.​ ​Yet,​ ​all​ ​evidence​ ​suggests​ ​that​ ​many​ ​of​ ​us​ ​do​ ​not​ ​follow through. 7. Why​ ​is​ ​parenthood​ ​being​ ​“reconsidered”?​ ​Why​ ​is​ ​parenthood​ ​different in​ ​a​ ​modern​ ​society? a. Having​ ​a​ ​child​ ​is​ ​expensive​ ​and​ ​on​ ​top​ ​of​ ​that​ ​parents​ ​receive​ ​no​ ​help​ ​and support.​ ​To​ ​this​ ​end,​ ​reducing​ ​the​ ​enormous​ ​and​ ​unrealistic​ ​cultural expectations​ ​we​ ​have​ ​for​ ​parenthood​ ​is​ ​as​ ​important​ ​as greater​ ​cultural​ ​recognition​ ​of​ ​the​ ​unrelenting​ ​challenges​ ​and difficulties​ ​associated​ ​with​ ​having​ ​children​ ​of​ ​all​ ​ages.​ ​Although there’s​ ​no​ ​guarantee​ ​these​ ​changes​ ​would​ ​drastically​ ​improve the​ ​emotional​ ​lives​ ​of​ ​American​ ​mothers​ ​and​ ​fathers,​ ​at​ ​least they​ ​would​ ​help​ ​minimize​ ​the​ ​emotional​ ​costs​ ​and​ ​maximize the​ ​emotional​ ​benefits​ ​of​ ​parenthood​ ​in​ ​the​ ​United​ ​States Today b. Parenthood​ ​differs​ ​in​ ​a​ ​modern​ ​society​ ​because​ ​our​ ​economy​ ​requires parents​ ​to​ ​have​ ​to​ ​work​ ​twice​ ​as​ ​hard​ ​to​ ​support​ ​their​ ​families.​ ​For example,​ ​families​ ​may​ ​be​ ​smaller​ ​in​ ​a​ ​modern​ ​society​ ​because​ ​parents have​ ​to​ ​support​ ​all​ ​their​ ​children​ ​and​ ​pay​ ​for​ ​their​ ​expenses​ ​such​ ​as healthcare​ ​and​ ​education,​ ​both​ ​very​ ​expensive. 8. How​ ​are​ ​Freegans​ ​reacting​ ​to​ ​the​ ​excesses​ ​of​ ​modern​ ​society?​ ​Why​ ​is their​ ​lifestyle​ ​antithetical​ ​to​ ​consumerism?​ ​ ​Can​ ​you​ ​foresee​ ​a​ ​future where​ ​more​ ​people​ ​engage​ ​in​ ​this​ ​kind​ ​of​ ​behavior? a. Freegans​ ​are​ ​reacting​ ​to​ ​the​ ​expensive,​ ​and​ ​highly​ ​wasteful​ ​views​ ​and actions​ ​our​ ​modern​ ​society​ ​upholds​ ​and​ ​values. b. Their​ ​lifestyle​ ​is​ ​antithetical​ ​to​ ​consumerism​ ​because​ ​consumerism​ ​urges people​ ​to​ ​buy​ ​more,​ ​spend​ ​more,​ ​and​ ​update​ ​to​ ​the​ ​newest​ ​and​ ​best products​ ​but​ ​Freegans​ ​are​ ​saving,​ ​salvaging,​ ​and​ ​reusing.​ ​Just​ ​because something​ ​is​ ​old​ ​does​ ​not​ ​mean​ ​it​ ​is​ ​not​ ​functional c. Dumpster​ ​diving​ ​remains​ ​on​ ​the​ ​fringe,​ ​but​ ​the​ ​beliefs​ ​and​ ​values​ ​behind it—self-sufficiency,​ ​reinvention,​ ​and​ ​wasting​ ​less—are​ ​not​ ​so​ ​marginal. Like​ ​the​ ​preindustrial​ ​activities​ ​that​ ​have​ ​become​ ​so​ ​popular​ ​recently— pickling,​ ​canning,​ ​composting,​ ​animal​ ​husbandry—dumpster​ ​diving​ ​is ​an extension,​ ​albeit​ ​an​ ​extreme​ ​one,​ ​of​ ​a​ ​cultural​ ​movement​ ​that​ ​derives pleasure​ ​and​ ​pride​ ​from​ ​ecological​ ​consciousness​ ​and​ ​personal production. d. Although​ ​dumpster​ ​diving​ ​is​ ​a​ ​bit​ ​of​ ​a​ ​stretch,​ ​i​ ​would​ ​not​ ​be​ ​surprised​ ​if​ ​it becomes​ ​more​ ​common​ ​in​ ​the​ ​future.​ ​Thrift​ ​shopping​ ​used​ ​to​ ​be something​ ​only​ ​for​ ​“poor​ ​people”​ ​and​ ​was​ ​viewed​ ​as​ ​gross​ ​to​ ​most​ ​people, but​ ​recently​ ​it​ ​became​ ​a​ ​huge​ ​hit​ ​for​ ​younger​ ​generations​ ​wishing​ ​to​ ​buy clothing​ ​that​ ​is​ ​fashionable​ ​but​ ​affordable​ ​considering​ ​the​ ​high​ ​prices people​ ​try​ ​selling​ ​clothes​ ​to​ ​consumers​ ​nowadays.​ ​Therefore,​ ​dumpster diving​ ​and​ ​other​ ​Freegan​ ​actions​ ​could​ ​actually​ ​be​ ​seen​ ​as​ ​a​ ​holy​ ​grail​ ​to people​ ​trying​ ​to​ ​save​ ​money​ ​or​ ​can’t​ ​afford​ ​the​ ​expensive​ ​clothes​ ​trying​ ​to be​ ​sold​ ​to​ ​them. Below,​ ​match​ ​Goffman,​ ​Cooley​ ​and​ ​Mead​ ​to​ ​the​ ​figure​ ​that​ ​best​ ​represents​ ​their theories​ ​of​ ​the​ ​self. Self​ ​:​ ​Cooley I;​ ​ME:​ ​Mead Core​ ​self;​ ​management:​ ​Goffman Additional​ ​links: ...
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