Week 3.docx - Week 3 Descriptive Statistics Imagine you have finished your degree and are seeking your next vocational opportunity You search various

Week 3.docx - Week 3 Descriptive Statistics Imagine you...

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Week 3: Descriptive Statistics Imagine you have finished your degree and are seeking your next vocational opportunity. You search various websites that provide you information on mean and median salaries along with standard deviations for job titles you are interested in across different geographic locations. But what do these statistics really tell you? What is your possible earning potential within this job title? How do salaries vary across different locations? Where can you make the most money? What percentages of people in that job title have the salary you are looking for? Descriptive statistics provide you with the answers to these basic questions. You are exposed to descriptive statistics every day and in many different ways. As Wheelan (2013) suggested, “descriptive statistics give us insight into phenomena that we care about” (p. 31). As you consider descriptive statistics in your daily life, also think about how understanding these data can propel you to the next level of developing your knowledge and skill set in quantitative analysis. In this week, you will examine descriptive statistics to measure central tendency and variability. You also will explore the results of the data to determine implications for social change. Learning Objectives Students will: Analyze measures of central tendency Analyze measures of variability Analyze implications for positive social change Analyze descriptive statistics of categorical data Photo Credit: [Shehzaad Maroof]/[Moment]/Getty Images Learning Resources Required Readings Frankfort-Nachmias, C., & Leon-Guerrero, A. (2018). Social statistics for a diverse society (8th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Chapter 3, “Measures of Central Tendency” (pp. 63-93) Chapter 4, “Measures of Variability” (pp. 94-127) Wagner, W. E. (2016). Using IBM® SPSS® statistics for research methods and social science statistics (6th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Chapter 4, “Organization and Presentation of Information”
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Chapter 11, “Editing Output” Datasets Document: Data Set 2014 General Social Survey (dataset file) Use this dataset to complete this week’s Discussion. Note: You will need the SPSS software to open this dataset. Document: Data Set Afrobarometer (dataset file) Use this dataset to complete this week’s Assignment. Note: You will need the SPSS software to open this dataset. Document: High School Longitudinal Study 2009 Dataset (dataset file) Use this dataset to complete this week’s Assignment.
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