WK4Assgn1WilliamsonN.docx - Running head GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 1 Growth and Development and Psychosocial Issues Submitted as Week 4 Assignment 1

WK4Assgn1WilliamsonN.docx - Running head GROWTH AND...

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Running head: GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 1 Growth and Development and Psychosocial Issues Submitted as Week 4 Assignment 1 Natasha Williamson Walden University, NURS 6541 December 19, 2017
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GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 2 Examination of Growth and Development In my practicum experience I examined a 9-year-old boy who has recently been diagnosed with Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). School-aged children (specifically 8-9 year-old children) should present with the following milestones: can jump, skip, and chase, can dress and groom themselves completely, can use basic tools (hammer, screwdriver), are graceful with their movements, can draw, count backwards, understands the concept of space, has an increased attention span, can name months and days of the week, enjoys clubs and groups, is modest about their body, and likes competition and games (Stanford Children’s Health, n.d.). Typically, ADHD is diagnosed in school aged (up to age fourteen) children, but can be diagnosed as late as adulthood. The ADHD child will present with impulsivity or inattentiveness, might fidget, or act like they are “run on a motor”, they might talk excessively or interrupt frequently, or they might have trouble waiting their turn. If the patient is diagnosed with ADHD with primary inattentive subtype (versus combined type or primary hyperactive-impulsive subtype) than they might presently slightly differently with distractibility, forgetfulness, not finishing tasks, losing things, poor organization, and may appear to not listen when spoken to (Stein & Perrin, 2003). Epidemiology of ADHD in the School-Age Child The prevalence of ADHD worldwide in children and adolescents is believed to be as high as 8.8% and is found to have several factors that affect the prevalence including age, gender, race, and geographical location (CHADD, 2016). According to CHADD, in the United States, 9.5% of children age 6-11 have ADHD. Boys are more likely to have an ADHD diagnosis than girls, and non-Hispanic white children are diagnosed more often than non-Hispanic blacks
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