Cpt3_4Ed_Stud - Chapter 3 Geographies of Population(pp 85-127 Chapter Objectives 1 Examine the national census and understand its limitations 2

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Chapter 3 Geographies of Population (pp. 85-127) Chapter Objectives 1. - Examine the national census and understand its limitations 2. - Investigate population distribution and structure 3. - Explore various population dynamics and processes 4. - Understand population movement and migration 5. - Discuss current population policies and debates Chapter Outline 1. - The Demographer’s Toolbox (p. 86) 2. - Population Distribution and Structure (p. 88) 3. - Population Dynamics and Processes (p. 96) 4. - Population Movement and Migration (p. 108) 5. - Population Debates and Policies (p. 119) 6. - Conclusion (p. 124) Case Studies - The People Bomb (video) - The Baby Boom and the Aging of the Population (p. 98) 1
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1. The Demographer’s Toolbox Demography : the study of the characteristics of human populations - information - census data - vital records Census : - a count of the number of people in a country, region, or city (+ marital status, income) - every ten years (ending with zero) (US: since 1790) - very expensive & complicated to administer Importance: To apportion seats in the U.S. House of Representatives. To redistribute federal tax refunds and other revenues to states, countries, and cities. Limitations: ? o Data collected every ten years becomes obsolete. o Difficult to compare international data. Decision : 1985 /introduced a quinquennial census (5 years) Vital records : include such records as those of birth/death, marriage/divorce, diseases Note : see the link in the textbook’s website 2
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2. - Population Distribution and Structure Characteristics : 1999 : the world was inhabited by 6 billion people Population is NOT distributed evenly around the world: continents, counties, metropolitan areas – Fig. 3.2 ; Table 3.1 (p. 89); www.prb.org/ Almost all of the world’s inhabitants live on 10 % of the land (temperate climate, low-lying or flat areas, and contains fertile soils) Approx. 90 % live north of the Equator Asia: 61% of the world’s inhabitants; Africa: 13%; and Europe: 12% Factors : - Environmental/physical: degree of accessibility, topography, soil fertility, climate and weather, water availability and quality and natural resources. - Country’s political and economic experiences : former centers of trade or former colonial administrations areas. - Culture : religion, traditions, or historical experiences. Population Density and Composition 3
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Crude (arithmetic) density : the total number of people divided by total land area e.g.: Phoenix – 3,000 persons/sq. mile; New York – 24,000/sq. mile Nutritional density : the ratio between the total population and the amount of land under cultivation in a given area Agricultural density : the ratio between the number of agriculturalists or farmers per unit of farmable land (the ability of the land to support a population’s food needs) Healthcare density - the number of people per physician in the total population. Composition
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This note was uploaded on 03/19/2008 for the course GEOG 1101 taught by Professor Connor during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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Cpt3_4Ed_Stud - Chapter 3 Geographies of Population(pp 85-127 Chapter Objectives 1 Examine the national census and understand its limitations 2

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