Hamlet Open Argument Final Draft.pdf

Hamlet Open Argument Final Draft.pdf - Lewin 1 Haley Lewin...

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Lewin 1 Haley Lewin Mr. Kuhlmann AP Language and Composition 3 March 2017 Revenge: A Poor Decision Really Throughout all of human history, there has always been the always looming presence of grief within the human psyche. The fear that a loved one will die or the fear that oneself might die shapes most people’s existence. Every human being, regardless of when and where s/he lives will experience the soul crushing despair that comes with losing a person one cares for deeply. It is imperative that when one is faced with anguish or tragedy, one must come to terms with his/her own suffering without surrendering to the dark side of grief. While often times the response to grief is to act vengefully, this reaction only serves to bring more suffering. In order to avoid the desire to take the path of revenge and sorrow, one must complete a healthy grieving process so as to truly accept the tragedy that has occurred. If one chooses to take part in a quest for vengeance in order to overcome one’s grief, then it is far more likely that s/he will bring even more suffering upon himself/herself and those around him/her. In Shakespeare’s Hamlet , Prince Hamlet elects to exact revenge on his Uncle Claudius for killing his father and then marrying his mother, rather than face his own grief. When approached by the vengeful apparition of his father who demands Hamlet revenge his murder, Hamlet leaps wholeheartedly into the hunt for retribution without questioning the validity of the ghost’s charge (Act 1 Scene 5). He embraces this crusade for justice, even going so far as pretending to be mentally ill in order to offer another explanation for his actions, and as a result
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Lewin 2 seven more people die by the end of the play. Most of the victims are innocents, completely unaware of Claudius’ wrong doing or Hamlet’s desire to bring him to justice. Hamlet is so blinded by his need to avenge his father that he fails to see the chaos he has sown. Chaos as a
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