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OK An OK button on a remote control From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Several terms redirect here. For other uses, see OK (disambiguation) , Okay (disambiguation) and Okey dokey (disambiguation) . " OK " ( / o ʊ ke ɪ / ; spelling variations include " okay ", "O.K." , " ok ") is an English word denoting approval, acceptance, agreement, assent, or acknowledgment. "OK" is frequently used as a loanword in other languages. It has been described as the most frequently spoken or written word on the planet. [1] As an adjective , "OK" principally means "adequate" or "acceptable" as a contrast to "bad" ("The boss approved this, so it is OK to send out"); it can also mean "mediocre" when used in contrast with "good" ("The french fries were great, but the burger was just OK"). It fulfills a similar role as an adverb ("Wow, you did OK for your first time skiing!"). As an interjection , it can denote compliance ("OK, I will do that"), or agreement ("OK, that is fine"). It can mean "assent" when it is used as a noun ("the boss gave his OK to the purchase") or, more colloquially, as a verb ("the boss OKed the purchase"). "OK", as an adjective , can express acknowledgment without approval. [2]As a versatile discourse marker or back-channeling item, it can also be used with Contents 1 Proposed etymologies 1.1 Boston abbreviation fad 1.2 Choctaw 1.3 West African 1.4 Alternative etymologies 2 Early history Article Talk Read View source View history Search Wikipedia Main page Contents Featured content Current events Random article Donate to Wikipedia Wikipedia store Interaction Help About Wikipedia Community portal Recent changes Contact page Tools What links here Related changes Upload file Special pages Permanent link Page information Wikidata item Cite this page Print/export Create PDF in your applications with the Pdfcrowd HTML to PDF API PDFCROWD
3 Variations 4 Usage 4.1 International usage 5 Gesture 6 Computers 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External links Proposed etymologies See also: List of proposed etymologies of OK Numerous explanations for the origin of the expression have been suggested, but few have been discussed seriously by linguists. The following proposals have found mainstream recognition. Boston abbreviation fad The etymology that most reference works provide today is based on a survey of the word's early history in print: a series of six articles by Allen Walker Read , [4] in the journal American Speech in 1963 and 1964. [5][6][7][8][9][10][11] He tracked the spread and evolution of the word in American newspapers and other written documents, and later throughout the rest of the world. He also documented controversy surrounding OK and the history of its folk etymologies , both of which are intertwined with the history of the word itself. Read argues that, at the time of the expression's first appearance in print, a broader fad existed in the United States of "comical misspellings" and of forming and employing acronyms, themselves based on colloquial speech patterns:

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