L+2-3+Biconditionals (1).ppt - Biconditional Statements Biconditional 2-4 2-3and Definitions Statements and Definitions Warm Up Lesson Presentation

L+2-3+Biconditionals (1).ppt - Biconditional Statements...

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Holt McDougal Geometry 2-4 Biconditional Statements and Definitions 2-3 Biconditional Statements and Definitions Holt Geometry Warm Up Warm Up Lesson Presentation Lesson Presentation Lesson Quiz Lesson Quiz Holt McDougal Geometry
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Holt McDougal Geometry 2-4 Biconditional Statements and Definitions Warm Up Write a conditional statement from each of the following. 1. The intersection of two lines is a point. 2. An odd number is one more than a multiple of 2. 3. Write the converse of the conditional “If Pedro lives in Chicago, then he lives in Illinois.” Find its truth value. If two lines intersect, then they intersect in a point. If a number is odd, then it is one more than a multiple of 2. If Pedro lives in Illinois, then he lives in Chicago; False.
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Holt McDougal Geometry 2-4 Biconditional Statements and Definitions Write and analyze biconditional statements. Objective
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Holt McDougal Geometry 2-4 Biconditional Statements and Definitions biconditional statement definition polygon triangle quadrilateral Vocabulary
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Holt McDougal Geometry 2-4 Biconditional Statements and Definitions When you combine a conditional statement and its converse, you create a biconditional statement . A biconditional statement is a statement that can be written in the form “ p if and only if q .” This means “if p , then q ” and “if q , then p .”
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Holt McDougal Geometry 2-4 Biconditional Statements and Definitions p q means p q and q p The biconditional “ p if and only if q ” can also be written as “ p iff q ” or p q . Writing Math
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Holt McDougal Geometry 2-4 Biconditional Statements and Definitions Write the conditional statement and converse within the biconditional. Example 1A: Identifying the Conditionals within a Biconditional Statement An angle is obtuse if and only if its measure is greater than 90° and less than 180°. Let p and q represent the following. p : An angle is obtuse. q : An angle’s measure is greater than 90° and less than 180°.
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Holt McDougal Geometry 2-4 Biconditional Statements and Definitions Example 1A Continued The two parts of the biconditional p q are p q and q p . Conditional: If an  is obtuse, then its measure is greater than 90° and less than 180°. Converse: If an angle's measure is greater than 90° and less than 180°, then it is obtuse.
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