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CHAPTER 22 Reading Guide: The Ordeal of Reconstruction, 1865–1877FOCUS QUESTIONS1. How did blacks respond to freedom, and what black organizations flourished? Responses throughout the slave population were extremely varied. A select few remained loyal to their master,refusing to leave, while others took out their full anger on the masters. They soon celebrated their freedom, and the Black Baptist Church and African Methodist Episcopal Church thrived.2. How had Lincoln hoped to accomplish Reconstruction, and what modifications did Johnson make to Lincoln’s original plan? Lincoln held the belief that the South actually never did legally secede from the USA. He pushed for the 10% reconstruction plan in which 10% of the voters in each state had to pledge allegiance to emancipation for the state to be readmitted to the Union. Lincoln then created a formal government. Johnson ended up disenfranchising certain Confederate leaders and called for states to repeal ordinances of secession, repay for their debts, and ratify the thirteenth amendment to allow them into the Union.3. In what ways was Congressional Reconstruction different than Presidential Reconstruction? The reconstruction through president was far more lenient, granting the South sufficient time to readjusttheir policies. However, reconstruction run by congress, mainly consisting of radical republicans, was much more unforgiving. They put in place a military law in the South, and limited the civil rights while adding amendments to the Constitution, radically changing the southern social structure.4. After gaining suffrage, how successful were blacks politically? Blacks created the Union league in the South and attempted to run, with the help of northern blacks, as republican candidates. Black women assembled informal town hall meetings. Black delegates were by far the most powerful at convention meetings, and some even went on to serve in the House or Senate.

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Term
Fall
Professor
MORGAN RICKS

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