Armstrong Kotler - Marketing_ An Introduction 12th Global Edition - Chapter 6.pdf - PART 1 DEFINING MARKETING AND THE MARKETING PROCESS(CHAPTERS 12 PART

Armstrong Kotler - Marketing_ An Introduction 12th Global Edition - Chapter 6.pdf

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My Marketing Lab Improve Your Grade!* OBJECTIVE 3 Explain how companies identify attractive market segments and choose a market-targeting strategy. Market Targeting 209–217 OBJECTIVE 4 Discuss how companies differentiate and position their products for maximum competitive advantage. Differentiation and Positioning 217–224 OBJECTIVE 1 Define the major steps in designing a customer-driven marketing strategy: market segmentation, targeting, differentiation, and positioning. Customer-Driven Marketing Strategy 196–199 OBJECTIVE 2 List and discuss the major bases for segmenting consumer and business markets. Market Segmentation 199–209 6 Customer-Driven Marketing Strategy Creating Value for Target Customers PART 1: DEFINING MARKETING AND THE MARKETING PROCESS (CHAPTERS 1–2) PART 2: UNDERSTANDING THE MARKETPLACE AND CUSTOMER VALUE (CHAPTERS 3–5) PART 3: DESIGNING A CUSTOMER VALUE–DRIVEN STRATEGY AND MIX (CHAPTERS 6–14) PART 4: EXTENDING MARKETING (CHAPTERS 15–16) Previewing the Concepts So far, you’ve learned what marketing is and about the importance of understand- ing consumers and the marketplace environment. With that as a background, you’re now ready to delve deeper into marketing strategy and tactics. This chapter looks further into key customer-driven marketing strategy decisions—dividing up markets into meaningful customer groups ( segmentation ), choosing which customer groups to serve ( targeting ), creating market offerings that best serve targeted customers ( differentiation ), and positioning the offerings in the minds of consumers ( positioning ). The chapters that follow explore the tactical marketing tools—the four Ps—by which marketers bring these strategies to life. To open our discussion of segmentation, targeting, differentiation, and position- ing, let’s look at master marketer Henkel. For over a hundred years, a big German company has made quick inroads into the GCC region with its varied offering of products that address the specialized laundry needs of men and women. Persil, the prince of Persian detergents, rakes in a huge market share and unparalleled sales in the region. How did Henkel achieve this? Careful segmentation and targeting—each product line offers a unique value proposition to a distinct segment of customers. Objective Outline CHAPTER ROAD MAP *Over 10 million students improved their results using the Pearson MyLabs. Visit for simulations, tutorials, and end-of-chapter problems.
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197 First Stop Henkel’s Persil: A Glocal Marketing Success Story Henkel—a well-known German company—was founded in September 1876 by Fritz Henkel in Aachen, Germany. The first product it launched was a silicate-based universal detergent. The company continues to succeed through innovation in new products that satisfy its range of customers and their different needs and preferences.
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