MLA Research Paper 2016.docx - Mrs Anthyia Olivia Rolle ID...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Mrs. Anthyia Olivia Rolle ID -000-08-3040 English 300 Ivy Higgins ACADEMIC ESSAY Major Bachelor in Business Administration: Management College of the Bahamas
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Topic: The Liberated Bahamian Women – does she exist? Thesis Statement: The evolution of the Liberated Bahamian Women. Political Liberation The effort to secure equal rights for women and to remove gender discrimination from laws, institutions, and behavioral patterns is defined as women’s right. The history of women's rights movement began in the nineteenth century with the demand by some women reformers for the right to vote, known as suffrage, and for the same legal rights as men. Though the vote was secured for women by the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920, most of the gains women have made in achieving legal equality and ending gender discrimination have come since the 1960s. Civil Rights legislation of that era was primarily focused on ensuring that African Americans and other racial minorities secured Equal Protection of the laws. However, the inclusion of sex as a protected category under the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C.A. § 2000e et seq.) gave women a powerful legal tool to end Sex Discrimination and to erase cultural stereotypes about females . The year 2012 marks the 50th anniversary of the culmination of the Women’s Suffrage Movement in the Bahamas. The Movement took place against the dramatic backdrop of the Burma Road Riots of 1942, the General Strike of 1958, the Labour Movement of the 1950s, and the majority rule and civil rights movements. Bahamian women worked tirelessly along with men to resist and redress the racial discrimination and the political and economic inequities that infused Bahamian society to the evolution of the liberated Bahamian women.
Image of page 2
Liberated is freedom from or opposed to traditional social and sexual attitudes or roles <a liberated woman> <a liberated marriage>.[mer] A sense of identity and the realization that life is her own to control and she is not dependent on other people for her security-emotional and monetary -nor does she believe what social custom has determined is her nature. She rejects the idea of women's natural dependency and passivity as a myth, and is concerned with the fulfillment of her potential as a person. In March 2014 as a guest speaker at The Bahamas Technical & Vocational Institute a liberated Bahamian woman, Ms. Janet Bostwick disclosed the discrimination she experienced when she first ran for parliament. “Many people felt a woman’s place is in the home” she stated. [Bah14] Ms. Bostwick went on to become the first female M.P. in The Bahamas (1977-2002). Between 1992 and 1994, she served as the Minister of Housing and Labour and from 1994 to 1995, the Minister of Justice and Immigration.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern