Reviewing the Scientific Debate on Human Cloning Ethics

Reviewing the Scientific Debate on Human Cloning Ethics -...

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Reviewing the Scientific Debate on Human Cloning Ethics” Dr. Leslie Frost English 102
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Abstract In this paper I review five articles that are related to the issue of human cloning. Even though this debate involves a scientific scope, much of it also involves ethical debate. This topic is so controversial, and invokes such a wide array of opinions, because it involves more than one scope of academia. Although four of the articles argue for the case of cloning, each arrives at this conclusion through different approaches. In the end, I decide that the article “Human clone: who is related to whom” is most effective in its argument because it considers the whole scope of the topic instead of being too narrow. Cloning Ethics 2
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Introduction The issue of human cloning is both exciting and controversial at the same time. It has sparked great debate within society due to its moral implications. Even though the technology of cloning has not been fully developed, the debate around the issue is mostly focused on the potential benefits and harms that it could do. In this paper I will review five articles that each have their own stance on whether human cloning should be allowed. Review In the first article, MacLachlan (2007) counters arguments typically used against the legalization of human cloning. He argues that all these arguments talk about the risks of cloning that are easily accepted in other areas of reproduction. For example, we accept genetically identical people in the form of twins. Also, the author points out that the concern for safety is not seen as sufficient grounds to make other forms of reproduction illegal. Lastly, he questions the idea that human cloning would alter the gene pool by arguing that global travel has had a greater effect on the gene pool than cloning ever would. In conclusion, the article asks the reader to rethink the arguments against human cloning and
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course ENGL 102 taught by Professor Frost during the Fall '07 term at UNC.

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Reviewing the Scientific Debate on Human Cloning Ethics -...

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