project 2 - S chla ck |1 Nicole Schlack English 101 Section...

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S c h l a c k  | 1 Nicole Schlack English 101 Section 48 Ms. Baldwin-Garcia Project 2 October 22, 2007 Humour Therapy in Patients with Late-Life Depression or Alzheimer's disease: a Pilot Study Alzheimer’s disease is a brain disorder named for German physician Alois Alzheimer, who first described it in 1906. In 1901, Dr. Alois Alzheimer identified the first case of what became known as Alzheimer's disease, in a 50 year-old patient Auguste D. and followed her to her death in 1906, when he first reported the case publicly. For most of the twentieth century, the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease was reserved for individuals between the ages of 45 and 65 who developed symptoms of pre-senile dementia. Senile dementia, as a set of symptoms, was considered to be a relatively normal outcome of the aging process, and thought to be due to age- related brain arterial "hardening." In the 1970s and early-1980s, because the symptoms and brain pathology were identical for any age, the name "Alzheimer's disease" became used equally for afflicted individuals of all ages. (Wikipedia, 2007) Today, we know that Alzheimer’s is a progressive and fatal brain disease, it is the most common form of dementia, and has no cure. Even though there is no cure, drug and non-drug treatments may help with both cognitive and behavioral symptoms.   In Alzheimer’s disease, parts of the cell’s factory stop running well. Scientists are not sure exactly where the trouble starts. But
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S c h l a c k  | 2 just like a real factory, backups and breakdowns in one system cause problems in other areas. As damage spreads, cells lose their ability to do their jobs well. Eventually, they die. At different stages, people with Alzheimer’s disease may experience physical or verbal outbursts, general emotional distress, restlessness, pacing, shredding paper or tissues and yelling, hallucinations (seeing, hearing or feeling things that are not really there), and/or delusions (firmly held belief in things that are not real) (Alzheimer's Association, 2007) Humour Therapy in Patients with Late-Life Depression or Alzheimer's disease: a Pilot Study was written by Marc Walter, Beat Hänni, Myriam Haug, Isabelle Amrhein, Eva Krebs-Roubicek,
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Cornett during the Fall '08 term at N.C. State.

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project 2 - S chla ck |1 Nicole Schlack English 101 Section...

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