ppVision.pptx - Vision CHAPTER 6 1 VISION Sensory receptor...

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CHAPTER 6 Vision 1
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VISION Sensory receptor A specialized neuron that detects a particular category of physical events. Sensory transduction The process by which sensory stimuli are changed into slow, graded receptor potentials. To convert one form of energy into another 2
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3 Figure 6.1 The Electromagnetic Spectrum
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4 Figure 6.3 The Human Eye
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5 Figure 6.5 Details of Retinal Circuitry
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6
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Connections Between Eye and Brain Lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) A group of cell bodies within the lateral geniculate body of the thalamus; receives inputs from the retina and projects to the primary visual cortex. Magnocellular layer transmits information necessary for the movement, perception of form, depth, and small differences in brightness to the primary visual cortex. Converys rod information Parvocellular layer transmits information necessary for perception of color and fine details to the primary visual cortex. Converys cone information 7
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8 Figure 6.6 Lateral Geniculate Nucleus (LGN) and Striate Cortex. Cresyl violet stain Layers 1 and 2 are the magnocellular layers; layers 3–6 are the parvocellular layers. The koniocellular sublayers are found ventral to each of the parvocellular and magnocellular layers.
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9 Figure 6.7The Primary Visual Pathway
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10 Figure 6.8 Central Versus Peripheral Acuity. Ganglion cells in the fovea receive input from a smaller number of photoreceptors than in the periphery and hence provide more acute visual information.
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11 Figure 6.9 ON and OFF Ganglion Cells. The figure shows responses of ON and OFF ganglion cells to stimuli presented in the center or the surround of the receptive field.
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TRICHROMATIC THEORY OF COLOR VISION The peak sensitivities of the three types of cones are
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