1984 Essay - Salzer 1 Max Leo Salzer Corey Hunt Pre-College Composition 18 September 2017 Theme in 1984 Have you ever been in a situation where you have

1984 Essay - Salzer 1 Max Leo Salzer Corey Hunt Pre-College...

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Salzer 1 Max Leo Salzer Corey Hunt Pre-College Composition 18 September, 2017 Theme in 1984 Have you ever been in a situation where you have just felt powerless and like you have no control over certain events that happen in your life? In the book 1984 by George Orwell, almost all of the members of society, excluding the highest members of the party, have almost no power or control over their own thoughts and actions and can be seen as puppets that are forced to do the will of their controlling government. This is done by the party using the aspects of fear and a type of thought process called doublethink which causes the normal individual of the society to believe almost everything, both the truth and lies, that the party tells them. This, however, is not the case with one specific character, Winston Smith, who has the ability to see past all of the lies that are being told and tries, even though he ends up unsuccessful, to overthrow this tyrannical force and make the world a better place because of it. It is through the life and actions of this tragic hero along with the use of many different literary techniques that the author makes it evident to us the belief of the strength and power of the thoughts and ideas of the individual, and how we should be wary of the totalitarian, communist, and dictatorial regimes which limit or take this away and end in ruin as a result.
Salzer 2 The first literary technique that the author uses to help strengthen this point of view is the setting. In the story, George Orwell uses this basic element of literature to show the major theme of the weakness, poverty, and destruction that comes with dictoralistic, communist, or totalitarian forms of government by first showing us readers through eyes and thoughts of Winston. In the beginning of the story, we see this evident form of ruin and economic struggle as Winston walks down the worn down path that connects his home from the ministry of truth where he works changing important documents of the party. “Were there always these vistas of rotting, nineteenth century houses, their sides shored up with balks of timber, their windows patched with cardboard and their roofs with corrugated iron, their crazy garden walls sagging in all directions? And the bomber sites where the plaster dust swirled in the air and the willow herb straggled over the heaps of rubble; and the places where the had cleared a larger path and there had sprung up sordid colonies of wooden dwellings like chicken houses?” (2) Along with this very clear image, the author also keeps vividly describing the horrendously decrepit environment that the people live out their days in. One way the author continues to do this is by showing us, in detail, the lives and homes of the proletarians, the poorest members of the society who are left to struggle for their lives without the jobs and rations that the normal party members like Winston receive. “He was walking up a cobbled street of little two-story houses with battered doors which were one was very easily able to connect to a rat’s hole.” (82) Along with the housing,

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