Anthem for Doomed Youth- IOC.docx - ANTHEM FOR DOOMED YOUTH...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

ANTHEM FOR DOOMED YOUTH 1. Anthem For Doomed Youth What passing-bells for these who die as cattle? Only the monstrous anger of the guns. Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle Can patter out their hasty orisons. No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells; Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells; And bugles calling for them from sad shires. What candles may be held to speed them all? Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes Shall shine the holy glimmers of good-byes. The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall; Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds, And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds.
ANTHEM FOR DOOMED YOUTH Introduction This poem was written while Owen was convalescing in Craiglockhart mental hospital in Edinburgh, 1917. This poem metaphorically explores the disgust, horrors and the pity of war with a funeral. This poem is about the waste of many young men in the first world war, who could not die peacefully because they did not receive proper funeral services. Therefore, the ‘Anthem for Doomed Youth’ is thus written to show how young men with otherwise better futures are being remorsefully thrown into the war machine, their short lives ending with undignified deaths. In essence, the ‘Anthem for Doomed Youth’ is a comparison to the funeral and death rites that these soldiers should have, and what they get instead. This poem combines satire and elegy with remarkable economy, and brings home to the reader an enormity of a tragedy that dragged on year after year. I will be exploring the effect of structure, the use of certain stylistic devices, such as imagery and oxymoron that help to develop the theme of the horrors, pity and the lack of traditional rituals in war. Structure of the poem The poem ‘Anthem for Doomed Youth’ is in the form of a sonnet . Traditionally, a sonnet is a type of poem that is used to express love. Thus, Owen uses this form of structure to illustrate how a love for one’s country could lead to death, like in the case of these soldiers. It also enables Owen to differentiate his poem from other war poems, as most war-time poetry draws light to the violence of war. However, Owen describes war in a calm and peaceful manner. The sonnet is split up into two parts; an octet (first stanza) and a sestet (second stanza) . In each of the stanzas, Owen focuses on different aspects of the battle. The first stanza serves to emphasize the horrors of war, whereas the second stanza serves to convey the pity of war and the lack of traditional

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture