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101Ch.15 Early-Bronze.pptx - Ch 15-Earliest Art to Bronze...

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Ch. 15-Earliest Art to Bronze Age 15.1- Trace the origins of early art in the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods. 15.2 Contrast scholarly theories about the cultural functions of the earliest artworks. 15.3 State technological and socio-economic changes that give rise to the first civilizations 15.4 Compare the stylistic and cultural features of art from Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt. 15.5 discuss art’s memorial function throughout history.
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Ch. 15-Earliest Art to Bronze Age To me there is no past or future. If a work of art cannot live always in the present it must not be considered at all. The art of the Greeks, the Egyptians, the great painters who lived in other times, is not an art of the past; perhaps it is more alive today than it ever was. Pablo Picasso
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Ch. 15-Earliest Art Art history differs from other kinds of history in that works of art from the past are with us in a way that makes it viable for one-on-one communication between an artist and viewer sometimes over the span of thousands of years. Chapter 15
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Ch. 15-Earliest Art to Bronze Age Horseshoe Canyon Chauvet & Lacaux Caves Blombos Cave Paleolithic Figures Tigris & Euphrates River Reg ion Indus River Region Yellow River Region Murujuga Petroglyphs Nile River Region There is no better or best in comparing the art of various societies, though until some 50 years ago there were marked biases in the studies thereof.
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Earliest Art- the Paleolithic Period - 2,000,000 years ago- East Africa- stone cutting tools - 1,000,000 years ago – Africa, and then a bit later in Asia and Europe chipped flake cutting edges - 750,000 years ago- Choppers and hand axes that were refined and symmetrical. - -100,000 years ago, beads and sprinkled powders. Chapter 15- Earliest Art to Bronze Age https:// www.youtube.com / watch?v =xob4BB4mRcA
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Earliest Art- the Paleolithic Period -250,000 years ago- Pigment stones, used as a form of crayon. The flattened side shows where the stone has been rubbed off during drawing. Limonite from Zambia. Chapter 15- Earliest Art to Bronze Age
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Earliest Art- the Paleolithic Period Colors from left to right: Rich Brown: Red Ocher/Haematite (iron oxide) Yellow: Yellow Ocher/Limonite (iron oxide). White: Diatomaceous Earth, Black: Charcoal Pinkish Red: Cinnabar (mercury sulfate), Golden Yellow: Yellow Ocher/Limonite (iron oxide) Flat Yellow: Yellow Ocher/Limonite (iron oxide). Bright Red: Red Ocher/Haematite (iron oxide), Black: Graphite, Dark Red: Red Ocher/Haematite (iron oxide) , Chapter 15- Earliest Art to Bronze Age How to paint a mammoth...
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Earliest Art- the Paleolithic Period Chapter 15- Earliest Art to Bronze Age
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Earliest Art- the Paleolithic Period Chapter 15- Earliest Art to Bronze Age Archaeologists digging in the Blombos Cave in South Africa found pieces of ochre, a rock with high iron content, which had been inscribed with marks which appear to be symbols.
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