FRANKLIN_unit1.final

FRANKLIN_unit1.final - 1 Della Franklin English 102 Leslie Davison Unit 1 Introduction The Prevalence of Bacterial Meningitis on College Campuses

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Della Franklin English 102 Leslie Davison Unit 1 Introduction 2/15/08 The Prevalence of Bacterial Meningitis on College Campuses Meningococcal meningitis is a detrimental and often fatal disease, which unfortunately infects thousands of individuals each year. Without proper treatment, long-term side effects and even death can occur. Regrettably, 9% - 12% percent of meningitis cases end in fatality (Collins, Dupont, Nagle 2003). Considering the severity of meningococcal meningitis, preventative measures should be taken to protect those who are statistically more susceptible to infection, notably among them, college students. Universities should require vaccination for college bound individuals and hold informational sessions regarding the disease and the transmission of the disease. Bacterial meningitis is best treated when caught early. The earlier the diagnosis, the more productive the treatment will be. Common symptoms include neck stiffness, fever, fatigue, and severe headache. Several medical tests, such as lumbar punctures, can be performed to determine if an individual is in fact suffering from meningococcal meningitis (WebMD 2007). Many of these symptoms are very common among college students; therefore, the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is particularly worrisome given the potential risks, including fatality. Bacterial meningitis is a growing concern on college campuses nationwide. College students are at risk of infection given their social lifestyles. According to Lana Kuenzi, “Certain social behaviors common among college students, such as exposure to active and passive
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 smoking, bar or nightclub patronage, sharing cigarettes or beverage containers, intimate contact with others, and excessive alcohol consumption also increase students' risk of exposure” (2004). In addition to the risk associated with social interaction, students have a heightened risk of infection due to the compact physical context of the college setting in which they live. College freshmen are especially prone to meningococcal meningitis as they typically are
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course ENGL 102 taught by Professor Frost during the Spring '07 term at UNC.

Page1 / 5

FRANKLIN_unit1.final - 1 Della Franklin English 102 Leslie Davison Unit 1 Introduction The Prevalence of Bacterial Meningitis on College Campuses

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online