essay 2 final

essay 2 final - Franklin, Della 10/22/07 Essay II, Draft 3...

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Franklin, Della 10/22/07   Essay II, Draft  3 1 Genetic cloning is a controversial issue that brings about a series of ethical dilemmas. Cloning has the potential to cure a growing number of diseases originating from genetic disorders. Where does one draw the line between medical advancement and personal ethics? Is it considered wrong to clone complete human beings, yet understandable to clone specific human chromosomes? From a world perspective, what rules apply? Cloning issues are debated daily. According to the Kristine Barlow-Stewart in The Centre for Genetics Education, Genetic cloning is a controversial procedure involved in gene therapy. Gene therapy provides hope for many suffering individuals as a prospective method of treatment for numerous debilitating and often fatal diseases. Gene therapy involves the identification of a specific gene that causes a particular disease on the infected individual’s chromosome. Once the faulty gene is located, it is spliced out of the cell and cloned from a healthy gene in a laboratory. Scientists correct the targeted gene during the cloning process to assure that the disease is rectified. Theoretically, the newly cloned gene is transplanted back into the body, and as a result, the consequent disease is cured. However, the method of delivery of the cloned gene to the original location remains less certain. Currently, a significant portion of gene therapy research is based on the perfection of a delivery mechanism for the transport of the gene back into the body (1). Generally, gene therapy is best suited for diseases that are single gene disorders (Lee et al 1752). Cystic Fibrosis is just that. Cystic Fibrosis, a debilitating genetic disorder that causes inflammation in the lungs and digestive system, is a perfect candidate for gene therapy. In 1989, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) protein was identified as the main cause of Cystic Fibrosis. The discovery of the gene was a major milestone in Cystic
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Franklin, Della 10/22/07   Essay II, Draft  3 2 Fibrosis treatment. Researchers began to search for new methods of treatment using the CFTR
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course ENGL 102 taught by Professor Frost during the Spring '07 term at UNC.

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essay 2 final - Franklin, Della 10/22/07 Essay II, Draft 3...

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