Lecture 3_Chapter 15_Climate Change.ppt

Lecture 3_Chapter 15_Climate Change.ppt - SC/EATS1410 F If...

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SC/EATS1410 F If you can, before coming to this lecture, please have yourself, your family members and friends answer the following: Which of statement reflects most closely your views of when global warming will begin? 1. Already begun/within a few years. 2. Within a lifetime. 3. Not within a lifetime/never. Of the number of persons surveyed by you, determine the percentage that answered (1), (2), and (3).
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SC/EATS1410 F This Gallup poll in the US shows that the number of Americans who believe that Global Warming is real has declined since 2008.
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SC/EATS1410 F In the previous lecture on hurricanes, we talked about how global warming is likely to increase sea surface temperatures, which will affect intensity and duration of hurricanes.
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SC/EATS1410 F Trend? Long-lasting change?
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SC/EATS1410 F Most of radiation emitted by the Sun, called “solar” radiation, is “visible” radiation, with a wavelength range of 400 to 700 nm (nm=nano metres or 10 -9 metres)
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SC/EATS1410 F Radiation and the Sun The source of energy for the Earth is radiation from the Sun. To understand climate and climate change we must first discuss radiation, what it is and how it transfers energy. What is radiation ? Energy that is radiated or transmitted in the form of waves (rays) or particles where the intensity of radiation energy is characterized by its wavelength or frequency. The electromagnetic (EM) spectrum is the range of all possible electromagnetic radiation.
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SC/EATS1410 F EM radiation with a wavelength between approximately 400 nm and 700 nm is detected by the human eye and perceived as visible light. The light we see is a very small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum [previous slide]. [The human eye evolved to be most sensitive to the wavelengths that the Sun emits most strongly.] Visible light (and near-infrared light) is typically absorbed and emitted by electrons that move from one energy level [discuss] to another in molecules and atoms. This is how radiation energy is transferred from one object to another. EXPLAIN!
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SC/EATS1410 F The energies in an atom are not uniformly spaced.  Workers in a subterranean weapons lab.  The spacing of  these levels is not uniform but decreases when closer to  the surface.  This non-uniform spacing resembles the  spacing of energy levels in an atom.
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SC/EATS1410 F The radiation emitted by the Earth and absorbed by its atmosphere is “infrared” radiation , with a wavelength range of 750 nm to 1 mm. The human eye is not sensitive to radiation in this wavelength range ... we cannot see infrared radiation ... but if we could, then we would see the Earth glow! We also cannot see UV radiation, but UV is very energetic short wave radiation, that can break chemical bonds, making molecules reactive by ionizing (i.e., removing electrons from their atoms) them.
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  • Spring '15
  • Mary Ann Jenkins

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