On Descartes's God.pdf - On Descartess God by Tyler...

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On Descartes’s Godby Tyler JungbauerIf we are to read any of Descartes’s work and fully understand the conclusions which he reachedvia the principles of logic he assumed, then first we must look at the initial premise to all of hisreasoning.And this method of reading Descartes’s thought -- by attending first to his initialpremises, from which he deduced further conclusions -- is a universal method of analyzingphilosophical argument. By parsing the initial assumptions and presupposed principles of logic athinker may use in their work, the analyst may arrive at a more complete, comprehensiveunderstanding of the work under question.And, as concerns Descartes, the most necessarypremise in all of his thought -- premise which Descartes reached by what he would have deemed“intuition,” instead of his more thoroughly understood deductive reasoning -- is his assumptionand use of God, not only as a being of His own right, but as a general rule of logic. Without God,Descartes’s method of ontological and epistemological thought is wasted, as God was to Descartesthe very pervasive source and well of knowledge from which he derived all the elixirs of thoughtand truth. But in analyzing Descartes’s thought more closely, one begins to see a gaping schismbetween what logic validly entails and what Descartes invalidly concluded. In short, Descartes wasnot as great a thinker as some would suppose him to be.René Descartes (c. 1596 - 1650), French geometer and mathematician, is known in the fieldof philosophy for his contribution to early Western epistemology, especially for his incipientskepticism.When one thinks of Descartes, perhaps the most famous of his claims is hisCogitoergo sum,which translates from Latin into the English “I think, therefore I am.” This reliance
upon cognitive experience is inherent to Cartesian thought, and perhaps it is this rationalistperspective on the human unit which appeals to Descartes’s readers. In reading Descartes, onesees an all-encompassing love and desire for thinking, this active participation of the person, theself, with the inner workings of the mind in which this self is contained.And yet, despiteDescartes’s predilection for thought and mind, he makes some very simple, though entirelynecessary, technical mistakes.And perhaps the most concerning aspect of Descartes's abuse ofthought is his ignorance of his mistakes. Though a genius in his own right, Descartes should haveremained a geometer and furthered his knowledge of squares, instead of trying to delve into thethroes of tempestuous philosophy.And this claim of mine only has bearing so long as weremember Descartes’s assumption of God as the total foundation for all of what Descartes thoughtand believed.

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