Civics Unit 1 2017.pdf - Civics Unit 1 Power Authority and Government Chapters 1-2 Chapter 1 Nature of Power Politics and Government Power and

Civics Unit 1 2017.pdf - Civics Unit 1 Power Authority and...

This preview shows page 1 out of 24 pages.

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 24 pages?

Unformatted text preview: Civics Unit 1: Power, Authority, and Government Chapters 1-2 Chapter 1 Nature of Power, Politics, and Government Power and Government (1.1) • Define Power, Authority, and Government as we read Chapter 1.1. • How do they relate to one another? How are they different? Five Sources of Power 1. Formal Authority: power obtained by a person’s position within an institution or organization 2. Expertise: power gained by knowledge or skills 3. Coercion: power obtained by force or the ability to punish 4. Rewards: Power gained by the ability to give a reward, like money, responsibility, or praise 5. Persuasion: power to influence people. Write down a person that holds each type of power. They can be famous or not. Legitimacy As you read the last section of 1.2, answer the questions in your notes: 1. Define legitimacy 2. How did each of the following doctrines determine legitimacy? • Mandate of Heaven, Divine Right of Kings, Social Contract Theory 3. What gives a person elected to the US Presidency legitimacy? Legitimacy and the US Presidency: Do we have a crisis in presidential legitimacy? What events in the past 3-4 months have led to concerns about the legitimacy of the electoral process? The Foundations of Government What are public goods? Three main purposes of ● A product or service that government: is available for all people ● Maintaining public order to consume whether they ● Protecting life and pay for it or not. The property consumption of the ● Providing Public goods product by one does not What are key powers that are essential for providing protection and public goods? a. Means of coercion b. Means of revenue keep another from consuming. ○ Parks, schools, protection Nation-States • Nation: a group of people who share a common ethnic origin, culture, and language. • State: is a geographical area controlled by a single government. Nation-states share these four characteristics: 1. 2. 3. 4. ________: occupies a specific geographic territory, with internationally recognized boundaries. ________: has people living permanently within its boundaries. ________: the people of a nation-state agree to live under a common legal system. ________: is independent and self-governing. Match the words ● National Sovereignty ● Territorial Integrity ● Stable Population ● Code of laws Politics: As your read 1.4 take notes on each of the following topics • Definition of Politics • Political Activity has Purpose • Political Activity involves Collective Action • Institutions define Political Activity (be sure to define institutions) 5 Political Games(1.5) Game Horse Trading “Winning by Giving to Get” Walkout “Winning by refusing to play” Power Struggle “Winning by being smarter and stronger than the opposition? Demolition Derby “Winning by wiping out the opposition” Civil Disobedience “Winning taking the moral high ground” Description Example 5 Political Games(1.5) Game Description Example Horse Trading Uses negotiation and bargaining to create a win-win situation. A teenager negotiates with their parents for a later curfew Walkout Refusing to give in to the opposition, forcing them to give you something you want A group of workers goes on strike or the government shuts down because of refusal to sign a budget. Power Struggle An attempt to outfox or overpower an opponent. Two employees try to outdo each other for a promotion. Demolition Derby An attempt to destroy your enemy. Jailing political opponents Although it can be physical, it often refers or ruining someone’s to making them lose their standing. reputation. Civil Disobedience Deliberately disobeying a law that is Civil Rights Movement or believed to be unjust in order to highlight Gandhi’s movement in the issue and force change. India GCE: Political Games Activity The politics of the CFA Hallway • FIRST: Take 2 minutes to silently re-read the section of your assigned political game. • SECOND: Each table will quietly discuss their assigned political game with their group to be sure that each person understands. Your assigned game is a secret from other groups. (Teams may move into the hall/office to discuss and plan) • Each group will devise a 1 minute skit demonstrating your assigned political game. – Your skits should be based on how your game may play out among students and/or teachers in the hallways of CFA. – The partners must be able to clearly connect their skits to their assigned political game. After the skit, the audience will try to figure out which game their skit addresses. HGCE: Political Games Assignment Chapter 2 Comparing Forms of Government Bellwork: Answer the following questions 1. In your opinion, which one of the following people or groups should have the power to make the rules at your school, and why? What are advantages or disadvantages of each? • Principal • Teachers • Student Council • Student Body • Other (specify) 2. Which group typically makes the rules at this school? Why do you think this is? 3. Are there groups/people you believe should not make the rules? Historical Forms of Government • Democracy vs. Republic (Greece v. Rome) • Absolute vs. Constitutional Monarchies • Totalitarianism – An authoritarian government that tries to control almost every aspect of its citizens lives – Totalitarian governments are not all the same--different goals Three Historical Forms of Totalitarianism Government Characteristics **All suppress opposition Communism Example: Soviet Union 1. 2. 3. Communist party hold control State should rule economy Hostile to religion and individual rights Fascism Example: Italy between WWI and WWII 1. 2. 3. Dictator holds power Extreme Nationalism Glorification of military Nazism Example Germany during WWII 1. 2. 3. Belief in racial superiority Elimination of minorities Rejection of civil liberties Forms of Government--Modern World (Chapter 2.3) Form Monarchy Dictatorship Theocracy Single Party State Direct Democracy Parliamentary Democracy Presidential Democracy Description Pros Cons Country Reports Chapter 2.4 Systems of Government: HOW is the power distributed? Systems of Govt. Unitary Examples Federal Examples Confederal Examples Description Pros Cons Diagram Systems of Government Regional Regional National Regional A. Unitary System: Power Concentrated at the central/national government Pros: National unity; laws same throughout country Cons: National govt. may not meet the needs of all regions Examples: Japan; most nations B. Federal System: Power divided between central/national gov. and regional gov. Pros: flexible to meet local needs Cons: Conflict between regional and national laws; different laws in diff. areas Examples: US, India C. Confederal Systems: Regions are indep. but work together for common goals Pros: meets local needs; sovereignty Cons: Central Government cannot resolve problems Examples: Early US Gov, European Union Economic Systems A. Traditional: economy based on habit and customs • • Pros: typically self-sufficient Cons: very little choice or trade, low standard of living B. Market: economy where producers and consumers make the decisions with very little govt. Interference • • Pros: efficiency Cons:can lack stability and create a big income gap C. Command: economy where the government makes most decisions • • Pros: more equality, basic needs met Cons: Less freedom, not efficient D. Mixed: market economy with some government regulation • • Pros: stability, growth Cons: not as much freedom, can lack efficiency Review ...
View Full Document

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture