MUS.101.11.14.17 (1).pptx - MUS 101 Romanticism 1 The Early...

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MUS 101: 11/14/2017 Romanticism 1
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The Early Romantics lied, lieder through-composed strophic song cycle études character pieces nocturnes program music concert overture program symphony idée fixe Dies irae 2
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The Early Romantics profoundly influenced by Beethoven deeply influenced by literary Romanticism 3
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The Lied German lied = song piano accompaniment Romantic poetry intimate mood not intended for concert hall performers seem to share emotional insights with the listener 4
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Through-Composed Songs use different music for each stanza often used for poems with frequent changes of mood or voice difficult to create unity 5
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Strophic Songs use the same music for all stanzas often used when stanzas are all similar in construction difficult to create variety 6
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Franz Schubert (1797–1828) earliest (and greatest?) master of the lied born and trained in Vienna father and brothers are school teachers as a child, Schubert wins a position in the choir at the imperial court: because of this, he also receives an education at a private school, usually available only to people of a higher class 7
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Franz Schubert (1797–1828) remained close with many of his friends (all men) from this schooling participated in reading groups, and evenings of song and poetry with them: “Schubertiades” 1814-1815: Congress of Vienna: beginning of a very conservative time in Viennese cultural life. Schubert’s reading groups may have been monitored and infiltrated by government spies: Schubert spends a short time in jail 8
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Franz Schubert (1797–1828) Many historians now believe he and many of his close friends may have been gay: we cannot know for sure, in part because of the political climate at the time Made his living as an adult by teaching and publishing—also with help of friends 9
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Franz Schubert (1797–1828) prolific—wrote nearly 700 songs in addition to symphonies, sonatas, etc. died in a typhoid epidemic but weakened by syphilis, which he contracted probably in 1823, at the age of 26: much of his work in the last five years of his life seems affected by his illness. 10
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Schubert, “Erlkönig” story song on a ballad poem by Goethe 8-stanza poem with many voices through-composed setting themes of death and the supernatural 11
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The Story of the Erlking a furious horseback ride through the night father tries to save his deathly ill son the Erlking comes for the child beckons, then cajoles, then threatens father does not see the demon when they reach home, the boy is dead in his arms 12
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The Music of the Erlking fast triplets suggest hoofbeats father’s music is low, gruff, stable son’s music is high, frantic, unstable demon’s music is ominously sweet tension lets up as they reach home stark recitative announces boy’s death 13
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Schubert, Erlking, text 14
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The Song Cycle a group of songs with a common theme
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