Week 7 Discussion.docx - Main Question Post Diagnosis and Management of Respiratory Cardiovascular and Genetic Disorders Case Study#2 Introduction The

Week 7 Discussion.docx - Main Question Post Diagnosis and...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 3 pages.

Main Question Post Diagnosis and Management of Respiratory, Cardiovascular, and Genetic Disorders – Case Study #2. Introduction The aim of this discussion is to explain the differential diagnosis for the patient in case study number 2 and offer the most likely diagnosis with explanation according to Walden University, (n.d.). This confab will include an explanation of the unique characteristics of the disorder identified in the primary diagnosis according to Walden University, (n.d.). An explanation of the treatment and management plan for the patient, including appropriate dosages of the recommended treatments will be offered. The strategies for educating parents and the patient about the treatment and management of the disorder will be provided according to Walden University, (n.d.). Case presentation Brian is a 14-year-old known asthmatic with a 2-day history of worsening cough and shortness of breath. He reports using a short-acting beta-agonist every 3 hours over the previous 24 hours. He has a long-acting inhaled corticosteroid, but the prescription ran out, and he forgot to get it refilled. He says he came today because he woke up at 2 a.m. coughing and couldn’t stop, thus preventing him from going back to sleep. Over-the-counter cough suppressants don’t help. He denies cigarette smoking, but his clothing smells like smoke. His respiratory rate is 18 and he has prolonged expiration and expiratory wheezes in all lung fields. There are no signs of dyspnea. All other exam findings are normal according to Walden University, (n.d.). Differential diagnosis The 14-year-old boy has a diagnosis and history of asthma disorder. The question becomes what caused the exacerbation of his condition? The differential diagnosis is as follows: Exposure to toxic substance: The exposure to common toxic substances can increase asthma symptoms according to Burns et al., (2017), children who are exposed to tobacco smoke, rapid changes in barometric pressure, change in temperatures gradients, exposure to known irritants such as paint fumes, air pollutants are all susceptible to asthma exacerbation. The child smelled like cigarette smoke, this may be the result of being in a cigarette smoke polluted environment long enough to have the smell on his clothes after two days. Exposure to this toxic environmental substance is my primary diagnosis. Foreign body aspiration: This condition can mimic respiratory problems such as asthma.
Image of page 1
Image of page 2

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 3 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture