MARS 1010 Exam 3 Study Guide

MARS 1010 Exam 3 Study Guide - MARS 1010 Exam 3 Study Guide...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MARS 1010 Exam 3 Study Guide 05/11/2007 19:29:00 MARS 1010 Exam 3 Study Guide     MARS 1010: Coasts, Beaches, and Estuaries  Objectives/Review Questions  1. What are the differences between primary and secondary coasts?  Erosion on primary coastlines is dominated by terrestrial processes at the land-air  boundary (e.g. glaciers, rivers, isostatic sea level change, volcanoes, faults).   At  Secondary coasts, Marine processes such as wave-erosion dominate. 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
a. Be able to recognize geographic examples of each type of coast.  Primary:  Glacier Bay, Alaska, Fjords (Milford Sound, New Zealand), Estuaries  (Chesapeake Bay), San Francisco Bay, USA, Volcanic coasts (like in Hawaii)  Secondary:  The Cape of Good Hope (South Africa), The White Cliffs of Dover,  Land’s End, Cornwall, England, Sea Island, GA (a barrier island; salt marsh on left) b. What kinds of processes are responsible for creating different coastal zones?  Glaciers, Rivers, volcanoes, and seismic disturbances affect primary coastlines,  and marine processes such as waves and tides affect secondary coastlines. 2. What are the differences between coastal zones, shores, and beaches?  A coastal zone is the interface between the land and water. These zones are  important because a majority of the world's population inhabit such zones. Coastal  zones are continually changing because of the dynamic interaction between the oceans  and the land. Waves and winds along the coast are both eroding rock and depositing  sediment on a continuous basis, and rates of erosion and deposition vary considerably  from day to day along such zones.  A shore or shoreline is the fringe of land at the edge  of a large body of water, such as an ocean, sea, or lake whereas the term beach  typically refers to shores which are sandy or pebbly. a. Describe the anatomy of a beach  A beach is divided into two parts, the foreshore, and the backshore which can be  distinguished from one another by the fact that the foreshore is the part that is under  water.  The backshore starts at the edge of the ocean and up onto land until it hits the  border of the “coast” c. How do beaches vary by season?  Why?  Small waves and average summer tides move sand from offshore to onshore
Background image of page 2
during summer and the Large waves and storm tides of winter move sand from  onshore to offshore during winter. 3. What is an estuary? 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

MARS 1010 Exam 3 Study Guide - MARS 1010 Exam 3 Study Guide...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online