The Black Cat Relationship

The Black Cat - The Black Cat Relationship Edgar Allen Poe is an extraordinary writer who puts his characters in what seems like ordinary

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The Black Cat Relationship Edgar Allen Poe is an extraordinary writer who puts his characters in what seems like ordinary relationships with unusual circumstances, with the narrator from “The Black Cat” being no different. In this story the narrator, whose name is not given, is a married man who claims to have an alcohol problem. Throughout the story he has two key relationships with cats. These cats and the relationships they have with the narrator have similarities and their differences. The primary relationship is with a black cat named Pluto. The bond between the narrator and him is the foundation for the narrator's next relationship, which is with a black cat with a white spot. The narrator's interaction with both of these characters is significant to the story. Both hurt by betrayal, the cats “have terrified-have tortured-have destroyed” the narrator's life (64). Pluto is the reason for the story's existence. He is the only character in the story who Poe thought was important enough to have a name, he has the strongest bond with the narrator. Pluto —this was the cat's name —was my favorite pet and playmate. I alone fed him, and he attended me wherever I went about the house. It was even with difficulty that I could prevent him from following me through the streets.(65) These two had a relationship that evolved over years. Out of a selection of birds, rabbits, fish, a dog, and a monkey, Pluto was without a doubt the favorite animal. One could
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argue that he was the narrator's preferred companion period. Pluto often received better treatment than the wife. While the others were witnessing the effects of the narrator's “disease” firsthand, the narrator says, “I still retained sufficient regard to restrain me from
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This note was uploaded on 03/20/2008 for the course ENGL 1102 taught by Professor Cantremember during the Spring '08 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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The Black Cat - The Black Cat Relationship Edgar Allen Poe is an extraordinary writer who puts his characters in what seems like ordinary

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